What about the church’s responsibility?

I enjoyed reading John H. Redekop’s reasonings about the recent Vancouver hockey rioting.
To me, however, there seems to be a lot more at stake here.

Re: Riot showed erosion of morality, July 7, 2011.

I enjoyed reading John H. Redekop’s reasonings about the recent Vancouver hockey rioting.

To me, however, there seems to be a lot more at stake here.

Redekop refers to how that young people assert that “rightness” is determined by “what feels good for me!.”

What concerns me a great deal is that many churches themselves preach a “feel-good” philosophy, in that once you become a Christian, “all will go well with thee,” even though my Bible clearly states that every human being is subject to trials and temptations while trotting this globe.

I can only wonder just how actively the church presents continual  clear-cut answers to  their listening audiences on these issues?

Some six weeks ago, Craig Bresett, wrote a letter to the paper, searching for truth about the true Love of God in dealing with humanity. Craig presented various biblical examples that he found difficult to understand. They were exactly the same type of questions I asked myself as a teenager until a religious leader asked me to read Job 38-44 in my Bible. My outlook changed. I was never the same after that.

What hurts me immensely, though, is the fact that not even one of the approximately 300 religious leaders, plus scores of retired pastors roaming around in Abbotsford, could not even be bothered to take the time to answer this searching soul.

A “luke-warm” attitude comes to mind.

I totally agree with Redekop’s suggestion that, “The systematic rejection of moral absolutes in education, in the media, and in entertainment has much more to do with malicious riots than do alcohol and notions of anarchism.”

I strongly believe, however, that a neglect of vibrant church teachings on moral issues should have been included in this list.

Gertie Pool