EDITORIAL: All-in airfare pricing

Airlines should be up-front when they advertise their fares.

Imagine going to a restaurant for a $5 steak dinner, but when you get there you discover being seated at a table will cost you $5, a surcharge of $7 for the plate and utensils and another $4 for the server to take your order. Add on the tip and HST and suddenly your cheap meal has become an expensive night out.

That’s how Canada’s airlines have been allowed to operate.

It’s marketing strategy; advertise only the base cost of the ticket, with the full price of that ticket, including all its various surcharges, fees and taxes revealed when the purchaser is about to commit.

Consumer advocates have been complaining about it for years.

In fact, the federal government did do something about it, adding the “all-in-one” airfare advertising clause to the Canadian Transportation Act in June 2007.

But lobbying by the airlines, which claimed the new pricing policy would put them at a disadvantage to foreign airlines who could continue to advertise only their base fares on their own websites, has delayed its implementation for years.

That’s about to change.

European airlines have been required to advertise the complete cost of a ticket since 2008. In January, American airlines will also fall in line with all-in airfares. The competitive disadvantage argument no longer exists.

So why will Canadian consumers have to wait another 12 months for a five-year-old law to finally be enforced?

While it’s likely that only the most naive traveler believes they could actually travel to England for $99, requiring the airlines to be up front when advertising their fares will empower consumers when making the best choice for their travel spending.

– Black Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Four activists face charges linked to 2019 Abbotsford hog-farm protest

Mischief and break-and-enter charges laid for incidents on four separate days prior to the protest

Three men face attempted murder charges after Harrison Hot Springs stabbing

Man, 24, sent to hospital with life-threatening injuries following attack Wednesday

‘Tiny home’ being built for Abbotsford woman with severe allergies

Online campaign raises $59,000 for custom cargo trailer for Katie Hobson

Chilliwack children can get tested locally, Fraser Health confirms

Erroneous information online and via 811 has many families driving to Abbotsford for testing

Face masks will be mandatory for customers at all Walmart locations

Requirement goes into effect on Wednesday, Aug. 12 across Canada

371 British Columbians battling COVID-19, health officials confirm

Thursday (Aug. 6) saw a second straight day of nearly 50 new confirmed cases

Visitors and non-residents entering closed remote B.C. First Nation’s territories

With limited resources, they say they don’t have any authority or power to enforce the closures

UBC loses appeal on Fisheries Act convictions

BC Supreme Court upholds order to pay $1.55-million fine

Masks to be mandatory on BC Transit, TransLink starting Aug. 24

Both BC Transit and TransLink made the announcement in separate press releases on Thursday

Acclaimed B.C. actor Brent Carver passes away

Carver, one of Canada’s greatest actors with a career spanning 40 years, passed away at home in Cranbrook

B.C. would not send students back to school if there was ‘overwhelming risk’: Horgan

Plan has left many parents across the province worried about their children’s safety

Canucks blank Wild 3-0, take series lead in penalty-filled NHL qualifying clash

Jacob Markstrom stops 27 shots to lead Vancouver past Minnesota

North Okanagan man chains himself to tree in protest of construction

Crews began work clearing space for a new facility Thursday, Aug. 6

Most Read