Three people were sent to hospital on Boxing Day after they were found unresponsive in a vehicle that crashed in Abbotsford. They were believed to be suffering from carbon-monoxide poisoning. (Kevin MacDonald photo)

Three people were sent to hospital on Boxing Day after they were found unresponsive in a vehicle that crashed in Abbotsford. They were believed to be suffering from carbon-monoxide poisoning. (Kevin MacDonald photo)

Mom and kid in carbon-monoxide poisoning incident released from hospital

Other child still in hospital after trio found unresponsive in car in Abbotsford on Boxing Day

A woman and one of her two children who were rushed to hospital with carbon monoxide poisoning on Boxing Day in Abbotsford have now been released from hospital.

The other child, age 3, remains in hospital but is expected to be released early next week. The prognosis for all three is “positive,” said Sgt. Judy Bird of the Abbotsford Police Department.

The trio were found unresponsive in a Toyota Corolla that appeared to have crashed in the 33700 block of Clayburn Road – just west of the Abbotsford-Mission Highway – on the evening of Dec. 26. First responders were called to the scene at about 8:20 p.m.

RELATED: One woman, two children rushed to hospital after Abbotsford car crash

Abbotsford Police Sgt. Judy Bird said police have now determined that the vehicle came to rest against a guard rail after the mom pulled over to the side of the road.

The woman, in her mid-20s, and her two kids – ages 3 and 5 – were overcome by carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning and were discovered by two passersby, Bird said.

Assistant Fire Chief Craig Bird of Abbotsford Fire Rescue Service said CO poisoning is most often caused by a vehicle left running in an enclosed area. But it can also be the result of exhaust fumes leaking into the passenger compartment of a vehicle.

Judy Bird said an inspection of the vehicle in this incident will have to be conducted to find the source of the leak.

CO poisoning can cause flu-like symptoms that include headache, dizziness, weakness, upset stomach, vomiting, chest pain and confusion. Prolonged exposure can lead to death.

“If you suspect your vehicle has an exhaust leak, please take it to a certified mechanic for inspection and repair,” Craig Bird said.