Sumas First Nation asks for illegal dumping to stop

Band sick of having to clean up trash dumped on land, including agricultural properties.

The Sumas First Nation is tired of trash and other debris being dumped on its land.

The Sumas First Nation is tired of trash and other debris being dumped on its land.

The Sumas First Nation is tired of people treating their land as a dump.

Stephen McGlenn, the land resources administrator for the First Nation, which is located along the southern edge of Sumas Mountain, said the band is sick of having to clean up all manner of trash.

“We often get people dumping household garbage, mattresses, unwanted soil or fill, or construction debris,” he said. Often the trash is found on agricultural land.

“It’s disrespectful if people think they can dump on our land,” McGlenn told The News. The problem has been an ongoing issue, and one that costs the band both time and money to clean up, he said.

Meanwhile, across Abbotsford along the Fraser River, fishermen discovered more than two dozen fire extinguishers that had been discarded along the river banks. 

The anglers, who were fishing at the north end of Bradner Road Sunday morning, recovered 23 of the extinguishers, but weren’t able to reach several more in the water. All of those recovered were expired, although many were still full. One extinguisher had no top and was partially full.