Court of Appeal for British Columbia in Vancouver. (File photo: Tom Zytaruk)

Sex offender who viewed underage girls as slaves has prohibitions cut from 20 to 10 years

Appeal court reviewed the case of Kyler Bryan David Williams, 29

A sex offender who treated two underage girls as his slaves and got one pregnant has had four of his court-ordered prohibitions cut in half by the Court of Appeal for British Columbia.

Kyler Bryan David Williams, 29, pleaded guilty on July 25, 2018 to two counts of sexual interference with a person under 16 years of age. The court heard he used a social media app called “Whisper” to connect with them.

A Surrey provincial court judge prohibited Williams, for 20 years, from being at a public park or pool where children under 16 are present, being within two kilometres of the girls’ homes, holding a job where he would be in a position of trust or authority over children under 16, and communicating with anyone under age 16 without the court’s approval. The appeal court reduced these prohibitions to 10 years.

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There is a publication ban on information that could identify the two victims, one a 14-year-old girl who Williams, the court heard, viewed as his “slave.” She ended their association, the court heard, after he told her, “If I want you to be pregnant, you will be.”

The other victim was 15 at the time.

“Contrary to her wishes,” Appeal Court Justice Patrice Abrioux noted, “Mr. Williams did not take precautions and she became pregnant.” She ended up placing the child for adoption. Williams also referred to this girl as his slave, slapped and choked her, and demanded her obedience.

Upon learning she was pregnant, the court heard, Williams told the girl to say she was 16 “in order to keep him out of jail,” the judge noted.

The girl said in her victim impact statement that Williams wouldn’t let her talk to her loved ones or friends without first obtaining his consent.

Williams was sentenced to six and a half years, less 18 months credit for time served. The appeal court in 2019 reduced his sentence to four years, which, with pre-trial credit, was effectively two and a half years in prison. It also varied one of his prohibitions and reduced three others. The Crown then sought leave to appeal the case to the Supreme Court of Canada. It was allowed in part, with the appeal of the sentence imposed by the sentencing judge being dismissed and Williams being ordered to complete the remainder.

“He has not done well in custody. He has been punched in the face, bullied and harassed by other inmates, eventually asking to be moved to a different unit because of personal safety concerns,” Abrioux noted in his reasons for judgment, with which Justices Bruce Butler and Christopher Grauer concurred.

The appeal court also modified an order prohibiting Williams from “using the Internet or any other digital network without approval of the court” to prohibiting him from “using the Internet or any other digital network for the purpose of communicating with a person under the age of 16 years, except for immediate family members, without appeal from the court.”

Abrioux said he considered the “ambit of the Internet prohibition to be overly broad and demonstrably unfit.”



tom.zytaruk@surreynowleader.com

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