School in B.C. will not begin on time: negotiator

Mediator walks away, ending hopes teachers' strike will end before school starts

  • Aug. 30, 2014 8:00 p.m.

By The Canadian Press

RICHMOND, B.C. – Veteran mediator Vince Ready has walked away from talks between British Columbia teachers and their employer, smothering parents’ hopes the school year will start on time.

The province’s 40,000 public school teachers went on strike two weeks before summer vacation in June, and the ongoing job action has many worried the start of school may be put on hold indefinitely.

After Ready left the bargaining table Saturday, Peter Cameron, the government’s negotiator, said the current round of talks was over.

Ready is widely regarded as one of Canada’s top labour troubleshooters, and many had held out hope his involvement would finally break the impasse between the two sides.

He brought Jim Iker of the teachers’ union and Cameron together for two days of exploratory talks, but walked out on the third.

But as the talks wrapped up, Cameron said Ready felt the two sides were still too far apart for mediation to begin, which means the school year is now unlikely to start on schedule Tuesday.

“This is effectively terminated,” he said. “We think we have been very frank with Vince.”

“It will not start on time,” Cameron said, referring to the school year.

Cameron said both sides will wait for Ready to determine when they are close enough to resume discussions.

Ready said he tried to establish a framework for mediated negotiations, but the effort failed.

“I just see no basis at this point for meaningful negotiations or mediation, so I’ve just declared an impasse,” he said. “I just don’t see an agreement here at this point.”

Despite Ready’s gloomy assessment, the BC Teachers’ Federation indicated it wasn’t giving up.

“As things stand now, the strike will continue, but we are still determined to get a deal before Sept. 2,” Iker wrote in a press release.

Iker, however, was clearly less optimistic when interviewed immediately after talks fell apart Saturday, admitting the chances of the school year starting on time were remote, at best.

“As of right now, school will not be starting on the second of September, though our teachers would love to be back at work,” he said.

Iker also accused the province’s negotiators of not being prepared to reach a fair settlement for students and teachers.

The B.C. Public School Employers’ Association has been bargaining on behalf of government throughout the dispute.

“The BCTF team tried to kick-start meaningful talks by dropping some proposals entirely and reducing others substantially,” Iker wrote. “Unfortunately, the government did not indicate they were willing to make any meaningful moves in return.”

Premier Christy Clark took to social media, saying government wants to have a fair deal as soon as possible, but it must be affordable for taxpayers.

“We want a deal that gives teachers a raise and invests in classrooms, but it must also be in line with settlements for other unions,” she tweeted.

Prior to discussions with Ready, Iker and Cameron met with Education Minister Peter Fassbender, who proposed that both parties put aside the most contentious issues and start mediation.

The issues Fassbender referred to are teachers’ grievances stemming from an ongoing legal battle between the union and government.

Earlier this year, the B.C. Supreme Court ruled in favour of the union, saying the province violated the union’s bargaining rights when it removed provisions related to class size and support from the teachers’ contract in 2002.

The government is appealing the decision.

Teachers have asked the government to set aside $225 million every five years to deal with contract grievances related to the court case, but the government wants to suspend the possible impact of the grievances until the appeal process has finished.

Iker said after the talk on Saturday that teachers were willing to reduce that fund to $100 million.

When Fassbender proposed leaving grievances out of bargaining, and allowing the courts to settle the matter, he argued it would allow negotiations to focus on the key issues.

Iker, however, dismissed that proposal after Saturday’s talks.

“Does the government really expect that teachers would bargain away everything the B.C. Supreme Court has already awarded us?” he wrote in a release. “And what future decisions might bring?”

There was little progress during the summer toward resolving the key sticking points — wages, class size, and support staff levels.

The government has said it will not legislate teachers back to work, but has proposed giving parents of children aged 12 and under $40 a day to help with daycare costs should the strike continue.

-By Steven Chua in Vancouver.

(The Canadian Press, CKNW)

Just Posted

Kindergarten kids from Evans elementary school in Chilliwack painted rocks with orange hearts and delivered them to Sto:lo Elders Lodge recently after learning about residential schools. (Laura Bridge photo)
Kindergarten class paints rocks with orange hearts in Chilliwack for local elders

‘Compassion and empathy’ being shown by kids learning about residential schools

Chilliwack potter Cathy Terepocki (left) and Indigenous enhancement teachers Val Tosoff (striped top) and Christine Seymour (fuchsia coat), along with students at Vedder middle school, look at some of the 500-plus pinch pots on Thursday, June 10 made by the kids to honour the 215 children found at Kamloops Indian Residential School. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
Chilliwack students make hundreds of tiny clay pots in honour of 215 Indigenous children

‘I think the healing process has begun,’ says teacher about Vedder middle school project

A program of the Fraser Valley Health Care Foundation enables patients to thank their health-care workers.
Fraser Valley program enables patients to say thanks to their health-care workers

Philip Harris Grateful Patient Program offered through health care foundation

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay
Webinar looks at sexual abuse prevention among adolescents

Vancouver/Fraser Valley CoSA hosts free online session on June 15

Emergency services were on the scene of an apparent stabbing Friday afternoon (June 11) in the 2400 block of Countess Street in Abbotsford. (Photo: Kaytlin Harrison)
Two suspects arrested after apparent stabbing in Abbotsford

Incident occurs Friday afternoon in 2400 block of Countess Street

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

“They will never be forgotten, every child matters,” says Sioux Valley Chief Jennifer Bone in a video statement June 1. (Screen grab)
104 ‘potential graves’ detected at site of former residential school in Manitoba

Sioux Valley Dakota Nation working to identify, repatriate students buried near former Brandon residential school

Most Read