Province will hold a round-table discussion on the new anti-dumping tariffs that the U.S. has placed on Catalyst Paper. (File photo)

Province steps up to help Catalyst Paper in war against U.S. duties

Paper company hit with more than 28 per cent in American tariffs

The province will meet with Catalyst Paper and community stakeholders to come up with strategies to protect the paper industry after the U.S. imposed hefty anti-dumping duties on the company.

Premier John Horgan announced on April 19 that he has invited Green Party caucus leader Andrew Weaver, opposition leader Andrew Wilkinson, representatives from Catalyst, local MLAs, mayors and representatives from Unifor to join him, Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology Bruce Ralston and Minister of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development Doug Donaldson in a round-table discussion on the issue.

He said the round-table will hear first-hand the impact of the case, and how to best work together to protect the workers that depend on this industry.

“These duties are unfair, especially to the people, families and communities who make their livelihood in this industry,” said Horgan.

“We’re listening to our industry partners, community stakeholders, and working alongside our federal colleagues to support the forestry and newsprint industry and do everything we can to ease the impact of these duties.”

The U.S. Department of Commerce recently announced a new 22.16 per cent anti-dumping duty on products produced by Catalyst mills in B.C., which includes mills in Crofton, Port Alberni and Powell River.

RELATED STORY: FEAR OF NEW U.S. ANTI-DUMPING DUTIES

With a 6.09 per cent preliminary American countervailing duty already in place, Catalyst Paper is now facing combined duties of 28.25 per cent.

In total, Catalyst’s mills in B.C. directly employ approximately 1,600 workers, including about 570 at the Crofton mill.

“We thank the government of British Columbia and the opposition parties for their support in calling for an end to these unfair and punitive duties,” said Ned Dwyer, president and CEO of Catalyst Paper.

“This unwarranted trade action comes at a challenging time for Catalyst. With fibre supply issues and other rising input costs, these duties further impact our competitiveness and we will continue to defend our company and our employees against them.”

Unifor, a union representing many of the Catalyst workers, has started a campaign against the duties and “Trump the bully”.

“Unfair tariffs aren’t just political theatre, they’re reckless policies that will close down mills and throw hundreds of Canadians out of work,” said Unifor president Jerry Dias.

Jon Lefebure, mayor of the Municipality of North Cowichan, where the Crofton mill is located, said “the fear is that if these punitive tariffs continue, the mill will be priced out of business.”

Just Posted

BREAKING: Clearbook Library evacuated due to bomb threat

Abbotsford Police continuing to investigate for remainder of the day

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Air quality advisory continues in the Lower Mainland

Smoke from Interior fires brings fine particulate

Plan to develop Fraser Valley Inn unveiled

Six-storey mixed-use building would recreate facade of existing structure and add public plaza

Cleaning up Abbotsford OK Tire after 2017 fire a ‘priority’ for company

Over a year after fire, rebuild delayed by environmental concerns, investigation, building requirements

‘We will not forget:’ Thousands attend funeral fallen Fredericton officers

Hundreds of officials marched in the parade, which included massed band, several police motorcycles

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights can be misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to march in Montreal’s Pride parade

Trudeau will end the day in his home riding of Papineau

Vancouver Whitecaps give up late goal in 2-2 draw with New York Red Bulls

Four of Vancouver’s next five games are at home

B.C. man designer behind Canucks’ retro jersey

Jeremie White was 20 years old when he told Canucks assistant GM Brian Burke he had a design

Lions give up late TD in 24-23 loss to Argos

B.C. falls to 3-5, fumbling away last-minute chance in Toronto

Most Read