Offender’s stay in halfway house extended

The National Parole Board (NPB) has said that a convicted sex offender must remain in a halfway house for at least another six months because he is not yet "emotionally or socially ready" to live on his own.

The National Parole Board (NPB) has said that a convicted sex offender must remain in a halfway house for at least another six months because he is not yet “emotionally or socially ready” to live on his own.

NPB documents from the decision on May 5 also indicate that Charles Harold White’s most recent psychological assessment assessed him as a “moderate to high” risk to re-offend.

The board said that without the extension of his time in a halfway house, White “would continue to pose an undue risk to the community.”

He was released from prison on Jan. 14, 2008, after serving his full five-year sentence for the sexual assault of a young girl while he was on conditional release for three prior sex offences.

White’s criminal history consists solely of sexual assaults against young girls – from the ages of three to six – over more than a decade. He has admitted to 10 prior incidents, according to the NPB documents.

He served a previous five-year sentence in the United States.

White was freed from prison on statutory release in July 2007 but was returned to jail two months later because the NPB  determined his risk was “elevated to the point of unmanageability.”

He then completed his full term and was released under a 10-year “long-term supervision order,” which requires him to abide by special conditions, including living in a specific residence.

The NPB is required to review the residency requirement at regular intervals to determine whether that condition is still necessary.

Although the NPB expressed concerns about White living on his own, board members noted there have been no reports that he has sought access to children since his release.

They also indicated that White has participated in sex offender programs, both in and out of prison, and has strong community support. However, during times of emotional crisis, he often makes “impulsive and unhealthy decisions,” they concluded.

“… this area continues to require close monitoring and support that cannot be offered outside of a (halfway house) environment.”

The board also decided that at this time, White will not be permitted overnight leave privileges until there is a “period of emotional stability.”