Hwy 37 turnout to Iskut Village (Googlemaps image)                                Hwy 37 turnout to Iskut (Googlemaps image)

Hwy 37 turnout to Iskut Village (Googlemaps image) Hwy 37 turnout to Iskut (Googlemaps image)

Northern B.C. homicides paralyze isolated village

Tahltan community of Iskut renews plea for RCMP detachment in wake of killings

  • Jul. 24, 2019 9:30 p.m.

The village of Iskut is reeling from a tense week in Northern B.C. that left three people dead and two suspected killers on the run.

The tiny Tahltan village of 330 sits 80 km south of the nearest RCMP detachment in Dease Lake, and just 25 km from the Stikine River Bridge on Hwy 37, the site where police found the abandoned, burning truck of two missing teenagers and the body of an unidentified man down the road in a highway pullout.

Iskut Band Chief Marie Quock

“We felt incredibly vulnerable because of the unknowns,” says Iskut Band Chief Marie Quock. “Seeing Facebook posts about a serial killer on the loose didn’t help.”

READ MORE: Timeline: Three dead in northern B.C. and two on the run

Iskut stretches out along the side of Hwy 37, the only paved road in or out of an area cherished for it’s wilderness and isolation. In the summer the highway is noisy with road-trippers and camper vans, a procession of unknown faces travelling to or from the Alaska Highway.

Villagers already suspected that whoever killed a young couple the week prior, half a province away, was probably using this route. And when the burning truck and the body were found just north of Iskut, all residents knew for certain was three people were dead, two were missing, a murderer was at large, and Iskut stood in the path of where the violence was travelling.

“The fact we don’t have an RCMP detachment here, and being on the highway, was something a lot of people were thinking about constantly. There was just fear and uneasiness… It wasn’t good around here,” says Quock.

“It’s going to take a while for everybody to get back to normal, if we ever do, but, yes, there is a big sense of relief.”

On July 23 RCMP officially named Kam McLeod, left, and Bryer Schmegelsky suspects in the homicide of Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese, two tourists who were found shot south of Liard Hot Springs on the Alaska Highway the morning of July 15. On July 24 RCMP laid charges against the teens in absentia for the second degree murder of Leonard Dyck, from Vancovuer. The suspects are still on the run and considered armed and dangerous.

That relief came Tuesday following the RCMP’s shocking announcement that the two Port Alberni teenagers, Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, were no longer considered missing and feared dead, but prime suspects in the shooting deaths 500 km away near Liard Hot Springs of couple Chynna Noelle Deese, 24, of North Carolina and Lucas Robertson Fowler, 23, of Australia.

To Iskut’s relief the suspects were no longer in the area, RCMP said, and now on the run in northern Saskatchewan. Later that afternoon witness reports placed them in Manitoba.

Late Wednesday afternoon, RCMP also connected McLeod and Schmegelsky to the highway pullout murder just north of Iskut. Police identified the victim as Leonard Dyck of Vancouver, and laid second-degree murder charges against the two teens in absentia, clearing the way for a Canada-wide arrest warrant.

READ MORE: Port Alberni teens charged with second degree murder

Quock said the RCMP had not visited Iskut until the night before telling press the suspects had left the province. To fill the security void families and neighbours were banding closer than usual in the already-close community.

Two Iskut men were also conducting car patrols of the streets and highway from 11 p.m. to 8 a.m.

Other reports say some residents were unlocking their hunting rifles and shotguns to keep them within arm’s reach.

“We had people not getting sleep at night,” Quock said. “We’ve got a number of women and children who are alone for two weeks because their spouses are in camp. These women were really having a hard time being alone.

READ MORE: ‘It’s incomprehensible’: Locals react to B.C. teens wanted for 3 deaths

“We can breathe easier now knowing no one’s lurking around. But there’s still the fact we’re on a main highway. We never know who’s passing through. I think now our people are going to be more vigilant, and when travelling I know they’re going to be very careful.”

For 20-odd years both Quock and the previous chief have pushed for an RCMP detachment in Iskut. For her community and the thousands of travellers every year passing through, Quock says it makes sense for increased police presence in such isolated territory with almost no cellular service.

In the wake of these murders, Quock says she and council will again make a formal request for an RCMP detachment or satellite office in Iskut, but she’s not hopeful.

“We’re so used to hearing ‘no.’ It’s always something,” she says. “They say the population is too low, and yes, it is low but we’re still people, we’re still at risk. The RCMP is over an hour away. Anything can happen here and by the time a police officer arrived it could be too late.”

– With files from Katya Slepian and Canadian Press


 


quinn@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Manitoba Manhunt

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Northern B.C. homicides paralyze isolated village

Chynna Noelle Deese of the North Carolina and Lucas Robertson Fowler of Australia were found dead from gunshot wounds roughly 20 kilometres south of Liard Hot Springs on July 15. (New South Wales Police Force/Facebook)

Chynna Noelle Deese of the North Carolina and Lucas Robertson Fowler of Australia were found dead from gunshot wounds roughly 20 kilometres south of Liard Hot Springs on July 15. (New South Wales Police Force/Facebook)

On July 23 RCMP officially named Kam McLeod, left, and Bryer Schmegelsky suspects in the homicide of Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese, two tourists who were found shot south of Liard Hot Springs on the Alaska Highway the morning of July 15, as well as another man found two kilometres from the missing teens’ truck. The suspects are still on the run and considered armed and dangerous. On July 24 RCMP laid charges against the teens in abstentia for the second degree murder of Leonard Dyck from Vancovuer.

On July 23 RCMP officially named Kam McLeod, left, and Bryer Schmegelsky suspects in the homicide of Lucas Fowler and Chynna Deese, two tourists who were found shot south of Liard Hot Springs on the Alaska Highway the morning of July 15, as well as another man found two kilometres from the missing teens’ truck. The suspects are still on the run and considered armed and dangerous. On July 24 RCMP laid charges against the teens in abstentia for the second degree murder of Leonard Dyck from Vancovuer.

Just Posted

Fraser Valley Bandits vice-president Dylan Kular has released a statement offering his support for Indian farmers in their recent struggles. The City of Abbotsford has thus far remained silent on the issue. (Highstreet photo)
Fraser Valley Bandits VP Dylan Kular speaks out on India, City of Abbotsford silent on issue

W.J. Mouat grad states he supports farmers, unclear if City of Abbotsford will release statement

Joe Fast of Abbotsford is on dialysis four days a week and has issued a public plea for a kidney donor. (Submitted photo)
Abbotsford man with 5% kidney function is desperately in need of a live donor

Joe Fast has a rare blood type and hasn’t yet been able to find a transplant match

Mia Skoone (left), with her cousin Gavin Nahal, has donated her birthday money to the ARH pediatrics unit for the past eight years. Now she is seeking sponsorships from local businesses to fund a UN conference she has been invited to. (Submitted)
One of Abbotsford’s most charitable youths seeking sponsors for conference trip

Abbotsford Senior Secondary School student Mia Skoone has been invited to UN event in May

Tabor Home in Abbotsford. (Ben Lypka/Abbotsford News)
COVID-19 outbreaks continue at 2 Abbotsford care homes

Tabor Home and Menno Home still battling the virus

Cottage-Worthington Pavilion
COVID-19 outbreak over at Abbotsford’s Cottage-Worthington Pavilion

Outbreak declared over at Fraser Health-run facility

Pickleball game in Vancouver on Sunday, November 8, 2020. B.C.’s public health restrictions for COVID-19 have been extended to adult team sports, indoors and outside. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
711 more COVID-19 cases detected in B.C. Friday

‘Virus is not letting up and neither can we’

Demonstrators, organized by the Public Fishery Alliance, outside the downtown Vancouver offices of Fisheries and Oceans Canada July 6 demand the marking of all hatchery chinook to allow for a sustainable public fishery while wild stocks recover. (Public Fishery Alliance Facebook photo)
Angry B.C. anglers see petition tabled in House of Commons

Salmon fishers demand better access to the healthy stocks in the public fishery

(Hotel Zed/Flytographer)
B.C. hotel grants couple 18 years of free stays after making baby on Valentines Day

Hotel Zed has announced a Kelowna couple has received free Valentines Day stays for next 18 years

Farmers raise slogans during a protest on a highway at the Delhi-Haryana state border, India, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rejected the diplomatic scolding Canada’s envoy to India received on Friday for his recent comments in support of protesting Indian farmers. Tens of thousands of farmers have descended upon the borders of New Delhi to protest new farming laws that they say will open them to corporate exploitation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Manish Swarup
Trudeau brushes off India’s criticism for standing with farmers in anti-Modi protests

The High Commission of India in Ottawa had no comment when contacted Friday

Nurse Kath Olmstead prepares a shot as the world’s biggest study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway Monday, July 27, 2020, in Binghamton, N.Y. U.S. biotech firm Moderna says its vaccine is showing signs of producing lasting immunity to COVID-19, and that it will have as many as many as 125 million doses available by the end of March. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Hans Pennink
Canada orders more COVID vaccines, refines advice on first doses as cases reach 400K

Canada recorded its 300,000th case of COVID-19 on Nov. 16

Apartments are seen lit up in downtown Vancouver as people are encouraged to stay home during the global COVID-19 pandemic on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. British Columbia’s deputy provincial health officer says provincewide data show the most important area B.C. must tackle in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic is health inequity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
Age, income among top factors affecting well-being during pandemic, B.C. survey shows

Among respondents earning $20,000 a year or less, more than 41 per cent reported concern about food insecurity

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Chilliwack General Hospital. (Jenna Hauck/ Progress file)
Chilliwack mother upset about son’s alleged suicide attempt after hospital discharge

Rhonda Clough said 34-year-old son suffering with bipolar disorder should have been kept in hospital

Victoria-based driving instructors are concerned for their own and the community’s safety with the continued number of residents from COVID hotspots in the Lower Mainland coming to the city to take their driving road tests. (Black Press Media file photo)
Students from COVID hotspots travel to Vancouver Island for driving tests

Union leader calls on government to institute stronger travel ban

Most Read