The aftermath of a fire started by overheated batteries in a drawer are shown in Charlottetown in this recent handout photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Damien Morris)

The aftermath of a fire started by overheated batteries in a drawer are shown in Charlottetown in this recent handout photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Damien Morris)

Battery fires: The potential danger hiding in your kitchen junk drawer

Batteries sparked a fire that nearly burned down a Canadian home

After putting up Christmas decorations this year, Damien Morris had some extra batteries left over and did what many people do — tossed them in a drawer for future use.

The loose batteries sparked a fire that could have destroyed his Charlottetown, P.E.I., home.

Morris said he had no idea batteries could pose such a danger, and he is sharing his story to warn others — with experts saying such fires are more common than most Canadians realize.

Health Canada says it received more than 100 consumer reports over the last year involving batteries — everything from overheating to starting fires.

“Any type of battery could potentially be a problem,” said Andrew Hulan, a product safety officer with Health Canada.

“The type of battery, when it does fail, that we tend to see more issues with is lithium-ion batteries. It just happens to be that the material with which a lithium-ion battery is constructed is reactive to the air. If that battery is breached, it fails in almost an explosive manner,” he said.

In July, the Newfoundland and Labrador Association of Fire Services issued warnings after two fires were blamed on lithium-ion batteries.

One of the fires, that left a brother and sister homeless in St. John’s, was blamed on batteries in a radio-controlled toy car.

Luckily, Morris’ Nov. 18 fire scare in Charlottetown wasn’t as tragic.

“At 2:30 in the morning we heard our smoke detectors going off. I got up and got the kids. My wife got up and said ‘I smell something weird’,” Morris said.

They went downstairs to discover the main floor of the home full of smoke, with the worst of the smoke in the kitchen, where it was billowing from a kitchen drawer.

“I opened the drawer and it all went in flames. I shut it quick. I grabbed the drawer and got my wife to open the patio door and I threw it outside,” Morris said.

“The fire damage wasn’t so bad. It was mostly smoke damage.”

Morris said emergency crews arrived and the fire marshal determined that the ‘C’ and ‘D’ size batteries he had stored in the drawer had started the fire.

“The two male ends of the batteries connected, creating heat energy and caught the combustible dish towels on fire,” he said.

Raynald Marchand, general manager of the Canada Safety Council, warns problems can often occur when charging batteries near fabric and other combustibles.

“It’s important that when you recharge the rechargeable batteries that you do it in a safe area so that they don’t overheat, and preferably recharge them when you’re home,” he said. “Computers which have large batteries are often recharged while on a couch or on a bed and they can produce quite a bit of heat while they are being recharged.”

He said lithium-ion batteries are of particular concern because they pack a lot of power and the contacts or terminals are often along one side.

“If you take a battery for a laptop or camera, all the terminals are on one side, so if those terminals are set against, say, a wet towel, or something else it is more problematic,” Marchand said.

Hulan said the main cause of problems is people not following the instructions that come with the batteries, particularly when it comes to charging them.

“Batteries are designed to be charged at a specific current and voltage. If you use a charger that is not rated to your battery then you increase the likelihood of overheating and damage to that battery,” Hulan said.

Both Marchand and Hulan say batteries need to be stored properly in their original container, or other non-conductive packaging to prevent them from being shorted.

And they say spent batteries should be taken to a proper recycling centre and never tossed in the garbage or in a fire.

Hulan also warns against improper storage of the small, “button” style batteries common in watches, greeting cards, and some toys and LED lights.

He said Health Canada has investigated a number of cases where young children have gotten the small batteries and swallowed them.

“That battery can actually burn through their oesophagus, their windpipe or stomach, and that leads to very serious and potentially fatal injuries,” he said.

Hulan said anyone experiencing a battery issue they believe poses a hazard should report it to Health Canada.

Morris said he’s just glad he was home when the fire started — or their house could have been destroyed.

He says with the holiday season upon us, and an increase in battery use, he hopes more people heed the warnings about battery safety.

Kevin Bissett, The Canadian Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Abbotsford’s Skully White (left), who donated his kidney in December, has started a campaign to find other recipients and donors. The first candidate is retired police officer Gavin Quon. White owns and operates a hotdog stand, Lullys Food Experience, out of the Abbotsford Canadian Tire parking lot. (Facebook photo)
Abbotsford hotdog-stand owner starts campaign to find kidney donors and recipients

Skully White donated his kidney to customer Tim Hiscock in December

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
18 school exposures in Abbotsford since Jan. 6

21 exposures since the the holiday break

Dallas Lajimodiere is wanted by the Abbotsford Police Department.
Man wanted by Abbotsford Police domestic violence unit

Dallas Lajimodiere has three arrest warrants, including for assault with a weapon

Russell Jonathon George Gurney was last seen in Chilliwack in mid-December. (RCMP photo)
RCMP ask for help to find missing Abbotsford man last seen in Chilliwack

Police and family are concerned for the well-being of Russell Jonathon George Gurney

Grade 6 students at Eugene Reimer Middle School have been participating in the Equity Backpack Project. (Submitted photo)
Equity Backpack Project in Abbotsford addresses inclusion and anti-racism

Grade 6 teacher Nerlap Sidhu says she wants students to develop ‘strong sense of self’

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, vice-president of logistics and operations at the Public Health Agency of Canada, speaks at a news conference on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
B.C. records 500 new COVID-19 cases Wednesday, 14 deaths

Outbreak at Surrey Pretrial jail, two more in health care

Gov. Gen. Julie Payette takes the royal salute from the Guard of Honour as she makes her way deliver the the throne speech, Wednesday, September 23, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand
Gov. Gen. Julie Payette resigns after searing report into workplace culture: reports

Payette, who is the Queen’s representative in Canada, has been the governor general since 2017

Grounded WestJet Boeing 737 Max aircraft are shown at the airline’s facilities in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, May 7, 2019. WestJet will operate the first commercial Boeing 737 Max flight in Canada today since the aircraft was grounded in 2019 following two deadly crashes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Passengers unfazed as WestJet returns Boeing 737 Max to service on Vancouver flight

After a lengthy review process, Transport Canada cleared the plane to return to Canadian airspace

The top part of the fossil burrow, seen from the side, with feathery lines from the disturbance of the soil – thought to be caused by the worm pulling prey into the burrow. (Paleoenvironntal Sediment Laboratory/National Taiwan University)
PHOTOS: SFU researchers find evidence of ‘giant’ predatory worms on ocean floor

Fossils found the prove the existence of an ancient Taiwanese worm as long as two metres

RCMP officers provide policing for 63 B.C. municipalities under a provincial formula based on population. (Black Press file photo)
B.C. communities warned of upcoming RCMP unionization costs

Starting salaries for city police officers are 30% higher

Brandon Nathan Teixeira, charged in connection with a fatal 2017 shooting in South Surrey, is to return to court Feb. 2, 2021. (File photos)
Pre-trial conference set for accused in 2017 South Surrey killing

Brandon Nathan Teixeira set to return to Vancouver court Feb. 2

(Pxhere)
B.C. nurse suspended after using Tensor bandage to trap long-term care patient in room

Susan Malloch voluntarily agreed to a three-day suspension of her certificate of registration

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Toronto-based director Michelle Latimer was recently scrutinized after years of claiming she was of Algonquin and Metis descent. (CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)
Haida activist calls for hefty fines, jail time against those who claim to be Indigenous

Filmmaker Tamara Bell proposing the Indigenous Identity Act – to dissuade ‘Indigenous identity theft’

Most Read