Kids have learning options

Virtual schooling offers online advantages for some students

Brad Hutchinson

Sponsored by Abbotsford Virtual School | Impress Branded Content

Students don’t all learn the same way, so why are they being taught the same way?

Virtual or online learning might be the next logical step for the future of education, and Abbotsford Virtual School (AVS) is on the cutting edge in our ever-changing and technology-driven world. That’s according to AVS principal Brad Hutchinson who says his school is unique in its ability to offer students

the life/school balance that works best for them.

AVS is a public school that offers blended learning, a mix of onsite and at-home courses, is available from kindergarten to Grade 9 with plans to expand the onsite classes to Grade 12 due to growing popularity. Online courses are available for grades eight to twelve, with many adults taking AVS courses to upgrade and enter college programs.

High performance athletes who often travel credit AVS with allowing them to pursue their dreams and graduate from high school. Families doing missionary work or travelling for large portions of the year can continue their B.C. education. High school students who want to get ahead, need to catch up or who can’t fit a course into their schedules can pick up an online course at AVS at virtually any time of the year. Students with learning difficulties, anxiety issues or who just want a quieter and smaller school setting have also blossomed at AVS, and the resource room staff work closely with teachers to customize curriculum for students with special needs.

At the elementary and middle school levels, onsite classes several times a week are offered where students do hands-on and interactive learning such as inventing their own 3D objects with the school 3D printer. New secondary high tech, inquiry-based

on-site class are starting in September.

Even though they are called a ‘virtual school’, the learning environment feels far from remote. Parents are excited to be more involved in their children’s education while benefiting from the expertise of B.C.-certified teachers and the opportunities for their kids to connect with peers.

Parental support is vital for the success of students, particularly in the elementary and middle school years. For high school students, being self-directed and an independent worker are key.

Every year, Abbotsford Virtual School supports thousands of learners with diverse learning needs from all over BC — even when they are thousands of miles away from home. To find out if AVS is the right choice for you or your family, visit avs34.com and check out their Facebook page to see all the great things happening at AVS.

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