Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone was released on June 26, 1997. (IMDB Photo)

Making Millennials feel old: the first Harry Potter book was released 22 years ago

Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone was released on June 26, 1997

If you thought listening to a younger generation’s slang made you feel old, or seeing movie sequels like Monster’s University and Finding Dorry come to fruition, this will add fuel to the fire — 22 years ago the first Harry Potter Book was released.

Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone — the book that started it all — was released on June 26, 1997. The title was later changed to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and despite the initial book coming in at 135 on the USA Today’s Best-Selling Book List back then, it’s safe to say fans seem to enjoy the series.

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Harry Potter and the Sourcer’s Stone is now listed as one of the 30 best-selling novels of all time according to Life Magazine, coming in at fifth on the list just after The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien and The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exuper.

With more than 11 million copies sold of just the latest book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, and eight movies, two prequels and a third in the works bringing in over $9 billion at the worldwide box offices, fans still want more.

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On June 4, J.K. Rowling took to her website to answer one of her most asked questions — is she writing more Harry Potter books?

According to the post, there has been some misreporting in the press that she’s about to publish four more Harry Potter stories and while the books are coming, they aren’t written by Rowling.

The series of four short non-fiction eBooks are ‘bite size e-reads’ themed by Hogwarts lessons contain no new material from Rowling but with material adapted from the companion audio-book which includes important discussion on centaurs, the Abracadabra charm, Nicolas Flamel’s tombstone and much more riveting conversation which can be found at pottermore.com.



kendra.crighton@blackpress.ca

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