Salmon

Volunteers learn how to clip adipose fins on approximately 12,000 coho fry Tuesday morning at the Abbotsford Ravine Park Salmon Enhancement Society. Tyler Thibault, community advisor with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, shows Alexandra and Pavel the correct process. The fins are clipped so that fisheries can track the fish. (John Morrow/Abbotsford News)

Volunteers clip fins of 12K coho salmon in Abbotsford

Procedure done through Ravine Park Salmonid Enhancement Society

  • Jun 22, 2022

 

A critical part of Campbell River Estuary restoration is the planting of native species like sedge grass to prevent erosion. (Binny Paul, Campbell River Mirror)

B.C. estuary a showcase for the reclamation of ruined habitat

Sterile former industrial wasteland in Campbell River e being restored as prime fish habitat

 

Braydon Puffalt and five-year-old daughter Lola take part in the Lions Pikeminnow Derby at Cultus Lake on June 15, 2019. This year’s fishing derby is set for Saturday, June 18. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)

Father’s Day weekend fishing derby will support recovery of Cultus Lake sockeye

Folks fish for pikeminnow which prey on juvenile sockeye, and invasive smallmouth bass

 

A bucket brigade on the Spokane River is releasing tagged salmon into the Columbia River system. (Lake Roosevelt Forum/Facebook

Spring salmon spotted for 1st time since 1930 in B.C.’s Columbia River

U.S. efforts to return salmon to Upper Columbia River gaining traction, some caught in BC waters

A bucket brigade on the Spokane River is releasing tagged salmon into the Columbia River system. (Lake Roosevelt Forum/Facebook
Chum salmon at the end of their life cycle in Fish Creek. (Andrea Reid photo)

B.C. salmon abundance ‘a sixth’ of what it was half-a-century ago: study

48 Indigenous knowledge keepers from 18 Nations spoke to UBC researchers about the decline in salmon

Chum salmon at the end of their life cycle in Fish Creek. (Andrea Reid photo)
Extreme turbulence at the slide in the Fraser River near Big Bar was blocking fish passage in June 2019. (Incident Command Post)

Research team looking to prevent another Big Bar landslide that could wipe out B.C. salmon

‘Goal is to determine where the next landslide (to) threaten salmon is going to happen:’ researcher

Extreme turbulence at the slide in the Fraser River near Big Bar was blocking fish passage in June 2019. (Incident Command Post)
Rainbow trout infected with whirling disease which damages the backbone of the fish causing them to swim in a “whirling” pattern. (Photo: Sascha Hallett, fishpathogens.net)

Concerns raised about possibility of invasive fish disease in B.C. waters

Whirling disease has decreased fish populations by 90 per cent in certain regions

Rainbow trout infected with whirling disease which damages the backbone of the fish causing them to swim in a “whirling” pattern. (Photo: Sascha Hallett, fishpathogens.net)
Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**

B.C. conservation group moves thousands of salmon that will produce millions of eggs

Human-propelled salmon run, carrying thousands of spawning salmon from a fish trap in the Salish Sea

Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**
Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**

B.C. conservation group moves thousands of salmon that will produce millions of eggs

Human-propelled salmon run, carrying thousands of spawning salmon from a fish trap in the Salish Sea

Members of the Mill Bay Conservation Society have helped thousands of salmon pass human barriers to their spawning grounds in Shawnigan Creek. The group will celebrate Earth Day on Friday by carrying a record-breaking 7,300 returning Coho salmon in a single season — 30 times more than 15 years ago when the society started counting the fish they carry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Mill Bay and District Conservation Society **MANDATORY CREDIT**
Canadian research vessel Sir John Franklin returned to Victoria after a month in the Pacific Ocean. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)

Science team returns from winter expedition with boatful of new info on Pacific salmon

Researchers studying impact of changing climate on decreasing salmon population

Canadian research vessel Sir John Franklin returned to Victoria after a month in the Pacific Ocean. (Jane Skrypnek/News Staff)
Spawning sockeye salmon make their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014. A coalition of Canadian groups wants Alaska's governor to halt that state's harvest of Canadian-bound salmon, and the groups are also criticizing the international treaty that prevents overfishing of Pacific salmon stocks.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Groups criticize Pacific salmon treaty, urge Alaska to protect B.C.-bound salmon

Report says only 110,000 sockeye were commercially harvested in all of B.C. in 2021

Spawning sockeye salmon make their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C. Tuesday, Oct. 14, 2014. A coalition of Canadian groups wants Alaska's governor to halt that state's harvest of Canadian-bound salmon, and the groups are also criticizing the international treaty that prevents overfishing of Pacific salmon stocks.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A dead chinook salmon is seen on the beach next to the Harrison River in Harrison Mills, B.C. Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Pacific Salmon Treaty fails to conserve B.C. fish, say advocates

Advocates say the public needs to apply pressure on both sides of the border

A dead chinook salmon is seen on the beach next to the Harrison River in Harrison Mills, B.C. Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A king salmon is laid out for inspection by Alaska Department of Fish and Game at the Mike Pusich Douglas Harbor officials at last year’s Golden North Salmon Derby on Aug. 25, 2019. Despite some setbacks the derby will take place this year, though with some changes to adapt to the coronavirus pandemic. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

Feds leaving West Coast fishing sector to flounder after salmon closures, harvesters say

United Fishermen and Allied Workers’ Union wonders why industry hasn’t had climate compensation

A king salmon is laid out for inspection by Alaska Department of Fish and Game at the Mike Pusich Douglas Harbor officials at last year’s Golden North Salmon Derby on Aug. 25, 2019. Despite some setbacks the derby will take place this year, though with some changes to adapt to the coronavirus pandemic. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Christoph Deeg, Pacific Salmon Foundation researcher. Photo by Alanna D Photography.

New Pacific Salmon Foundation research sheds new light on open ocean survival

Study examines relationship between environmental conditions, pathogens, and gene expression

Christoph Deeg, Pacific Salmon Foundation researcher. Photo by Alanna D Photography.
A B.C. aquaculture facility. Black Press file photo

Industry report: not renewing B.C. salmon farm licenses comes with $1.2 billion cost

Economic analysis says 4,700 jobs depend on 79 licenses set to expire at the end of June

A B.C. aquaculture facility. Black Press file photo
Spawning sockeye salmon, a species of pacific salmon, are seen making their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C., on Oct. 14, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Advocates say Canada can’t save struggling B.C. salmon stocks without Alaska’s help

Pacific Salmon Treaty failing to address harvest of B.C. fish by American fishers, observers say

Spawning sockeye salmon, a species of pacific salmon, are seen making their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C., on Oct. 14, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada closes recreational salmon fishing in the Skeena River watershed, including the Bulkley River. (Contributed Photo)

Northwest B.C. First Nations outraged by Alaskan interception of salmon

Gitxsan, Gitanyow, and Wet’suwet’en call on government to protect constitutional fishing rights

Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada closes recreational salmon fishing in the Skeena River watershed, including the Bulkley River. (Contributed Photo)
A king salmon is laid out for inspection by Alaska Department of Fish and Game at the Mike Pusich Douglas Harbor officials during the Golden North Salmon Derby on Aug. 25, 2019. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)

New report suggests Alaskan fisheries are overharvesting plummeting B.C. salmon stocks

Alaska criticized report, calling it was an “unfair and biased attack on Alaska salmon fisheries

A king salmon is laid out for inspection by Alaska Department of Fish and Game at the Mike Pusich Douglas Harbor officials during the Golden North Salmon Derby on Aug. 25, 2019. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Spawning sockeye salmon are seen making their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C., Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Logging in watersheds among stressors for declining Pacific salmon, experts say

Clear-cuts have disrupted the landscape’s natural mechanisms for mitigating floods and landslides

Spawning sockeye salmon are seen making their way up the Adams River in Roderick Haig-Brown Provincial Park near Chase, B.C., Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Lina Azeez (right), Roxanna Kooistra, both of Watershed Watch Salmon Society, and Lincoln Froese, talking about the Connected Waters Campaign, on Aug. 12, 2016 near the Fraser River in Chilliwack. (Jennifer Feinberg/ Chilliwack Progress file)

Building better flood protection means making it more fish-friendly: Watershed Watch

With post-flood repair money coming, it’s time to consider threatened salmon stocks, say advocates

Lina Azeez (right), Roxanna Kooistra, both of Watershed Watch Salmon Society, and Lincoln Froese, talking about the Connected Waters Campaign, on Aug. 12, 2016 near the Fraser River in Chilliwack. (Jennifer Feinberg/ Chilliwack Progress file)