Coronavirus

The U.S. and Canadian flags fly atop the Peace Arch at Peace Arch Historical State Park on the border with Canada in Blaine, Wash. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Elaine Thompson

U.S. senator asks Biden to reconsider U.S-Canada border limits

Border has been largely closed since March 2020

The U.S. and Canadian flags fly atop the Peace Arch at Peace Arch Historical State Park on the border with Canada in Blaine, Wash. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Elaine Thompson
Immanuel Covenant Reformed Church at 35063 Page Rd. in Abbotsford is among three Fraser Valley churches that the B.C. government is trying to get a court injunction against for holding in-person services. Public health orders issued in November have banned such gatherings. (Google Maps)

B.C.’s compromise on in-person worship at three churches called ‘absolutely unacceptable’

Would allow outdoor services of 25 or less by Langley, Abbotsford and Chilliwack churches

Immanuel Covenant Reformed Church at 35063 Page Rd. in Abbotsford is among three Fraser Valley churches that the B.C. government is trying to get a court injunction against for holding in-person services. Public health orders issued in November have banned such gatherings. (Google Maps)
Houston Rockets guard Victor Oladipo, right, blocks a pass attempt by Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Feb. 26, 2021, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)

Coronavirus sidelines most Toronto Raptors coaches

NBA has postponed 29 games this season because of virus-related issues

Houston Rockets guard Victor Oladipo, right, blocks a pass attempt by Toronto Raptors guard Kyle Lowry during the second half of an NBA basketball game Friday, Feb. 26, 2021, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara)
FILE - This Dec. 2, 2020, file photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows vials of the COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. The U.S. is getting a third vaccine to prevent COVID-19, as the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021 cleared a Johnson & Johnson shot that works with just one dose instead of two (Johnson & Johnson via AP)

Johnson and Johnson’s 1-dose shot cleared, giving U.S. 3rd COVID-19 vaccine

Health experts are anxiously awaiting a one-and-done option to help speed vaccinations

FILE - This Dec. 2, 2020, file photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows vials of the COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. The U.S. is getting a third vaccine to prevent COVID-19, as the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday, Feb. 27, 2021 cleared a Johnson & Johnson shot that works with just one dose instead of two (Johnson & Johnson via AP)
A guest looks out from a window at the Sheraton hotel near the Pearson International Airport, in Mississauga, Ont., Monday, Feb. 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Long wait times, lack of options frustrate travellers booking hotel quarantines

Travellers must show proof of a three-day hotel booking before boarding their flight to Canada

A guest looks out from a window at the Sheraton hotel near the Pearson International Airport, in Mississauga, Ont., Monday, Feb. 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston
War veteran Captain Tom Moore, poses for a photo at his home in Marston Moretaine, England, after he achieved his goal of 100 laps of his garden, raising millions of pounds for the NHS. (Joe Giddens/PA via AP)

WWII plane fly-past honours U.K. Captain Tom Moore at his funeral

The 100-year old’s charity walk raised almost $46 million for Britain’s health service last year

War veteran Captain Tom Moore, poses for a photo at his home in Marston Moretaine, England, after he achieved his goal of 100 laps of his garden, raising millions of pounds for the NHS. (Joe Giddens/PA via AP)
The number of people who would have died from a COVID-19 infection is likely to be much higher than recorded because of death certificates don’t always list the virus as the cause of a fatality, experts say. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Death certificates don’t reflect the toll of the pandemic, Canadian experts say

Deaths that have been recorded as a result of COVID-19 only reflect those who were tested for it

The number of people who would have died from a COVID-19 infection is likely to be much higher than recorded because of death certificates don’t always list the virus as the cause of a fatality, experts say. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Florists prepare bouquets as people wait in a long line to enter the New York City Marriage Bureau, on Valentine’s Day. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

New York mandates strict dance ‘zones,’ distancing when weddings resume

Dancers must wear face masks and stay within their 36-square-foot area

Florists prepare bouquets as people wait in a long line to enter the New York City Marriage Bureau, on Valentine’s Day. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
Five-year-old Nancy Murphy wears a full mask and face shield as she waits in line for her kindergarten class to enter school during the COVID-19 pandemic on Tuesday, September 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Variant of concern linked to COVID-19 outbreak at three Surrey schools

Cases appear to be linked to community transmissions, but schools will remain open

Five-year-old Nancy Murphy wears a full mask and face shield as she waits in line for her kindergarten class to enter school during the COVID-19 pandemic on Tuesday, September 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Remi Frederick, a Village Green employee receives her first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on Jan. 26 in Federal Way. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing

Canadian experts caution against temptations to comparison shop COVID-19 vaccines

Medical experts including Dr. Stephen Hwang say Canadians do not have the luxury to pick-and-choose

Remi Frederick, a Village Green employee receives her first dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on Jan. 26 in Federal Way. Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing
A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto, Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

From science to syringe: COVID-19 vaccines are miracles of science and supply chains

Single vaccine dose made up of more than 280 components, requires three manufacturing plants to produce

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto, Thursday, Jan. 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson presents bill to delay B.C.’s budget as late as April 30, and allow further spending before that, B.C. legislature, Dec. 8, 2020. (Hansard TV)

How big is B.C.’s COVID-19 deficit? We’ll find out April 20

More borrowing expected as pandemic enters second year

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson presents bill to delay B.C.’s budget as late as April 30, and allow further spending before that, B.C. legislature, Dec. 8, 2020. (Hansard TV)
Dr. Bonnie Henry leaves the podium after talking about the next steps in B.C.’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, January 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Dr. Bonnie Henry leaves the podium after talking about the next steps in B.C.’s COVID-19 Immunization Plan during a press conference at Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday, January 22, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
British Columbia provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry arrives to view the Murals of Gratitude exhibition in Vancouver, on Friday, July 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Death threats mount against Dr. Bonnie Henry, sparking condemnation from Horgan, Dix

Henry has become a staple on televisions in homes across British Columbia since January 2020

British Columbia provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry arrives to view the Murals of Gratitude exhibition in Vancouver, on Friday, July 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Bryan Adams with his mom, Jane Adams Clark, at Lions Gate Hospital. (Bryan Adams)
Bryan Adams with his mom, Jane Adams Clark, at Lions Gate Hospital. (Bryan Adams)
Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)

‘Stay local’: Dr. Henry shoots down spring break travel for British Columbians

B.C. is reportedly working with other provincial governments to determine March break policies

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry updates B.C.’s COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature. (B.C. government)
A kid in elementary school wearing a face mask amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Metro Creative)

Union asks why an elementary school mask rule wouldn’t work in B.C. if it does elsewhere

B.C. education minister announced expansion of mask-wearing rules in middle, high school but not elementary students

A kid in elementary school wearing a face mask amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Metro Creative)
A pharmacist prepares a COVID-19 vaccine at Village Green Retirement Campus in Federal Way on Jan. 26. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)

Canada approves use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine

The country joins more than a dozen others in giving the shot the green light

A pharmacist prepares a COVID-19 vaccine at Village Green Retirement Campus in Federal Way on Jan. 26. (Olivia Sullivan/Sound Publishing)
Carolyn Howe, a kindergarten teacher and vice president of the Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association, says educators are feeling the strain of the COVID-19 pandemic and the influx of pressure that comes with it. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)

Stress leave, tears and insomnia: B.C. teachers feel the strain of COVID-19

Teachers still adjusting to mask and cleaning rules, pressures from outside and within

Carolyn Howe, a kindergarten teacher and vice president of the Greater Victoria Teachers’ Association, says educators are feeling the strain of the COVID-19 pandemic and the influx of pressure that comes with it. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)

Many British Columbians now prefer routine virtual doctor’s visits: study

More than 82% feel virtual health options reduce wait times, 64% think they lead to better health

A new survey has found that virtual visits are British Columbian’s preferred way to see the doctor amid the COVID-19 pandemic. (Unsplash)