Climate change

Save Old Growth demonstrators blocked the northbound Pat Bay Highway early in the morning on June 13. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth/Twitter)

Save Old Growth protester shatters hip during B.C. highway blockade

Campaigners say they will continue actions until old growth logging is halted in B.C.

Save Old Growth demonstrators blocked the northbound Pat Bay Highway early in the morning on June 13. (Courtesy of Save Old Growth/Twitter)
A critical part of Campbell River Estuary restoration is the planting of native species like sedge grass to prevent erosion. (Binny Paul, Campbell River Mirror)

B.C. estuary a showcase for the reclamation of ruined habitat

Sterile former industrial wasteland in Campbell River e being restored as prime fish habitat

A critical part of Campbell River Estuary restoration is the planting of native species like sedge grass to prevent erosion. (Binny Paul, Campbell River Mirror)
Data collected via LEO satellites is being used for earth surface GHG surveillance by a B.C. firm. (pixabay photo)

B.C. space-tech exposing greenhouse gas emissions to better combat climate change

Vancouver’s Metaspectral gets $150,000 from the The Canadian Space Agency to analyze satellite data

Data collected via LEO satellites is being used for earth surface GHG surveillance by a B.C. firm. (pixabay photo)
Honey bees flit in and out of their colony atop an apartment building in Vancouver’s West End. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)

VIDEO: Vancouver rooftops home to a new breed of honey bee: one made to survive

Ensure Hive Future breeding queen bees to be resistant to deadly mites

Honey bees flit in and out of their colony atop an apartment building in Vancouver’s West End. (Jane Skrypnek/Black Press Media)
Photo depicting ocean warming and temperature change patterns. (Government of Canada)

Federal report shows the impact of warming oceans on B.C. coast

2021 Pacific Ocean report details climate change impacts and conservation goals

Photo depicting ocean warming and temperature change patterns. (Government of Canada)
B.C. chief coroner Lisa Lapointe released a report Tuesday (June 7) reviewing heat-related deaths in B.C. in summer 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Review into B.C.’s 2021 heat dome deaths finds 93% didn’t have air conditioning

Cooling requirements in new builds among recommendations by BC Coroners Service’s report

B.C. chief coroner Lisa Lapointe released a report Tuesday (June 7) reviewing heat-related deaths in B.C. in summer 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
On one of the hottest days of the summer, June 28, families gathered at Lake of the Woods along Highway 1 for some respite from the heat. And this reporter walked in fully clothed. (Jessica Peters/ Hope Standard file)

COLUMN: As deadly heat wave anniversary nears, are we any more prepared?

Now is the time for municipalities to inform its residents what to do and where to go in heat waves

On one of the hottest days of the summer, June 28, families gathered at Lake of the Woods along Highway 1 for some respite from the heat. And this reporter walked in fully clothed. (Jessica Peters/ Hope Standard file)
In this March 24, 2017 photo, a tick is displayed in Plainville, Mass. The prevalence of tiny crawling bugs that can carry Lyme disease is higher than ever in most of Canada this year, a leading tick researcher says, with the most ticks found in Ontario and Nova Scotia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Connors/The Sun Chronicle via AP

Experts expect bad year for ticks as disease-carrying bugs expand range in Canada

Researcher says climate change means each tick season will likely be worse than the last

In this March 24, 2017 photo, a tick is displayed in Plainville, Mass. The prevalence of tiny crawling bugs that can carry Lyme disease is higher than ever in most of Canada this year, a leading tick researcher says, with the most ticks found in Ontario and Nova Scotia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Connors/The Sun Chronicle via AP
A drop of maple water drips out of a spile from a tree that was just tapped at the Vanier Museopark sugar bush in Ottawa on Saturday, March 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Maple syrup producers see climate change as a threat to industry’s future

Syrup producers are recording declining yields due to increasing global temperatures

A drop of maple water drips out of a spile from a tree that was just tapped at the Vanier Museopark sugar bush in Ottawa on Saturday, March 13, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)

B.C. communities to receive new annual climate action funding

Each to recieve at least $38,000 annually for next 3 years

The Sparks Lake wildfire shown on June 30, 2021. Beginning in 2022, the B.C. government will provide communities with at least $38,000 a year to fight climate change. (BC Wildfire Service photo)
Flooding is shown in Hay River, N.W.T., on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. About 3,500 residents have been ordered to evacuate a town in the Northwest Territories as volatile water levels never before experienced in some areas cause extensive flooding and damage. People in Hay River, on the south shore of Great Slave Lake just north of the Alberta-N.W.T. boundary, were told late Wednesday to get to higher ground, travel to Yellowknife or register at the town’s community centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Caitrin Pilkington, Cabin Radio
Flooding is shown in Hay River, N.W.T., on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. About 3,500 residents have been ordered to evacuate a town in the Northwest Territories as volatile water levels never before experienced in some areas cause extensive flooding and damage. People in Hay River, on the south shore of Great Slave Lake just north of the Alberta-N.W.T. boundary, were told late Wednesday to get to higher ground, travel to Yellowknife or register at the town’s community centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Caitrin Pilkington, Cabin Radio
President and founder of Save A Dog Network, Katie Powell gets a kiss from a dog after bringing bags of dog food by canoe to stranded homes during flooding in Peguis First Nation, Man., Wednesday, May 4, 2022. Dozens of experts advising the government on the best way to adapt to the reality of climate change say we need to do more to prepare infrastructure for the threats of extreme weather and get faster to help Canadians recover when their lives and livelihoods are threatened by floods, fires and major storms.THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Lipnowski

Resilient infrastructure, faster disaster recovery needed to adapt to climate change

Since the 1960s, Canada has moved from about 30 climate-related disasters a decade to more than 100

President and founder of Save A Dog Network, Katie Powell gets a kiss from a dog after bringing bags of dog food by canoe to stranded homes during flooding in Peguis First Nation, Man., Wednesday, May 4, 2022. Dozens of experts advising the government on the best way to adapt to the reality of climate change say we need to do more to prepare infrastructure for the threats of extreme weather and get faster to help Canadians recover when their lives and livelihoods are threatened by floods, fires and major storms.THE CANADIAN PRESS/David Lipnowski
Flooding is shown in Hay River, N.W.T., on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. About 3,500 residents have been ordered to evacuate a town in the Northwest Territories as volatile water levels never before experienced in some areas cause extensive flooding and damage. People in Hay River, on the south shore of Great Slave Lake just north of the Alberta-N.W.T. boundary, were told late Wednesday to get to higher ground, travel to Yellowknife or register at the town’s community centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Caitrin Pilkington, Cabin Radio

Heavy flooding forces residents of Northwest Territories town from their homes

Never-before-experienced high waters in Hay River forces evacuation

Flooding is shown in Hay River, N.W.T., on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. About 3,500 residents have been ordered to evacuate a town in the Northwest Territories as volatile water levels never before experienced in some areas cause extensive flooding and damage. People in Hay River, on the south shore of Great Slave Lake just north of the Alberta-N.W.T. boundary, were told late Wednesday to get to higher ground, travel to Yellowknife or register at the town’s community centre. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Caitrin Pilkington, Cabin Radio
Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)

Coral reefs provide stunning images of a world under assault

Coral Morphologic shows real-world example of how coral communities can adapt at busy port of Miami

Marine biologist Colin Foord, rear, and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab, Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Miami. They have been on a 15-year mission to raise awareness about dying coral reefs with a company that presents the issue through science and art. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
Climate scientists Kim Cobb, poses for a portrait at the Georgia Institute of Technology on Thursday, April 14, 2022, in Atlanta. She tells people when they are anxious about climate change, “there’s not going to be a win, a shining moment where we can declare success,” but “it’s never going to be too late to act. It’s never going to be too late to fix this.” (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

How climate scientists keep hope alive as damage worsens

‘Everybody’s climate midwife’ and others on the front line find and share hope through action

Climate scientists Kim Cobb, poses for a portrait at the Georgia Institute of Technology on Thursday, April 14, 2022, in Atlanta. She tells people when they are anxious about climate change, “there’s not going to be a win, a shining moment where we can declare success,” but “it’s never going to be too late to act. It’s never going to be too late to fix this.” (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Minister of Environment and Climate Change Steven Guilbeault arrives to Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, May 5, 2022. Guilbeault says Canada’s big oil companies should be investing some of their record profits into projects to curb their greenhouse gas emissions. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Record profits for oil companies should be invested in climate action: Guilbeault

Oil boss says a new tax credit isn’t enough to convince producers to start carbon capture project

Minister of Environment and Climate Change Steven Guilbeault arrives to Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Thursday, May 5, 2022. Guilbeault says Canada’s big oil companies should be investing some of their record profits into projects to curb their greenhouse gas emissions. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
A haze of wildfire smoke from B.C. hangs over the downtown as pedestrian walks past in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, July 15, 2021. The record-breaking heat wave that scorched western North America in June 2021 was among the most extreme ever recorded globally, new modelling and analysis by researchers at universities in the United Kingdom shows. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Last summer’s B.C., Alberta heat wave was among most extreme ever recorded: UK study

Science Advances found just five other heat waves since the 1960s were more extreme

A haze of wildfire smoke from B.C. hangs over the downtown as pedestrian walks past in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, July 15, 2021. The record-breaking heat wave that scorched western North America in June 2021 was among the most extreme ever recorded globally, new modelling and analysis by researchers at universities in the United Kingdom shows. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Activists with Save Old Growth block traffic on the Trans-Canada Highway in Metro Vancouver last month, calling for an end to old-growth logging in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Save Old Growth *MANDATORY CREDIT*

B.C. highway blockades over old-growth logging aimed at forcing a dialogue, activists say

Demonstrations have targeted busy commuter routes in Metro Vancouver and southern Vancouver Island

Activists with Save Old Growth block traffic on the Trans-Canada Highway in Metro Vancouver last month, calling for an end to old-growth logging in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Save Old Growth *MANDATORY CREDIT*
A defaced road sign of a logging truck is seen near the protest site of Fairy Creek on southern Vancouver Island on Oct. 4, 2021. British Columbia’s forest minister Katrine Conroy says the province is working to implement a strategic review of B.C.’s old-growth management and is working with First Nations and other partners to develop a new long-term strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. announces $19 million in funding to Forests Ministry to fight climate change

$15 million will be used to fertilize about 8,500 hectares of forests to increase growth rates

A defaced road sign of a logging truck is seen near the protest site of Fairy Creek on southern Vancouver Island on Oct. 4, 2021. British Columbia’s forest minister Katrine Conroy says the province is working to implement a strategic review of B.C.’s old-growth management and is working with First Nations and other partners to develop a new long-term strategy. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Feds enshrining right to healthy environment but no clarity on what that means

Government will have up to two years after bill takes effect to define that right’s implementation

A man walks in frigid weather at Rundle Park as emissions rise from the Imperial Oil Strathcona Refinery, in Edmonton, Wednesday, Dec. 25, 2019. The federal government is pushing legislation to enshrine the right to a healthy environment into law but is giving itself up to two more years to define what that means. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck