Vancouver Giants’ Ty Ronning gets in the grill of Prince George Cougars goaltender Tavin Grant during WHL action at the Langley Events Centre earlier this season. Ronning was not afraid to go to the dirty areas en route to his single-season team record 61 goals in 2017/18. Gary Ahuja Langley Times file photo

Vancouver Giants’ Ty Ronning gets in the grill of Prince George Cougars goaltender Tavin Grant during WHL action at the Langley Events Centre earlier this season. Ronning was not afraid to go to the dirty areas en route to his single-season team record 61 goals in 2017/18. Gary Ahuja Langley Times file photo

Ronning leaving Giant legacy behind

Vancouver Giants sniper scored team-record 61 goals in final WHL campaign

Ty Ronning loves scoring goals, and he is good at it too.

Especially this past season, his final year of junior hockey with the Vancouver Giants, as the winger potted 61 goals, a new single-season team record.

SEE: Ronning sets new single-season Giants record in OT win

And he was consistent.

Playing in all but two of his team’s 72 contests, Ronning never went more than four games between turning the red light on, and that happened just once, in early October.

A further breakdown reveals he was held goal-less in just 28 games, scored once in 26 contests, while having 13 two-goal games and three hat tricks, scoring a goal in 60 per cent of his team’s games.

Asked to describe the feeling of slipping the puck behind a goaltender and into the net, setting off the goal horn and high fives from his teammates, he had to ponder the question for a minute or so.

“It is a huge rush of joy and emotion. It is the best feeling you can feel, especially if it is a close game,” Ronning explained. “It’s hard to describe because it is such a great feeling — there is no better feeling than scoring a goal for (your team).”

Ronning surpassed Evander Kane’s team record of 48 goals, set back in the 2008/09 season.

“(The record) is a huge honour, especially because I have been here for five years,” Ronning said.

“I grew up in Vancouver, I have played in Vancouver my whole life and to think that I may be able to create some history, put my name on a little thing is kind of cool.”

Ronning has done all this under the pressures and expectations which accompany being the son of not only a former NHLer, but also of one of the more popular members of the Vancouver Canucks, his father, Cliff Ronning.

“There is nothing really to deal with because it has always been there for me and I have grown up with the last name on my back,” he said. “There has always been expectations.”

But the message from his dad — a veteran of 1,137 games, scoring 306 goals and 869 points in that span — has always been simple: “What are they going to criticize you for if you are working your hardest?”

And hard work is clearly evident in the younger Ronning’s game, especially this past season as the Giants had a breakout season, returning to the WHL playoffs for the first time in four years.

“A lot of the doubters and the haters and the nay-sayers about me being too small, too light or too slow or not good enough,” he said about what motivates him.

Ronning is five-foot-seven and 172-pound and has always faced questions about his size. He was noticeably stronger on and off the puck this past season.

“I kind of take that and add it to the fire and I like proving people wrong — it’s an even better feeling than scoring,” he said.

Ronning played a big part in that, whether it was his on-ice production or his mentorship of the team’s younger players.

He is also great off the ice with the team’s fans and Lower Mainland community as evidenced by the fact Ronning is the Western Conference nominee for the Doug Wickenheiser Memorial Trophy as the WHL’s humanitarian of the year.

The winner — he is up against the Regina Pats’ Matt Bradley — will be announced at the WHL awards on May 2.

“In all my years of working in junior hockey, I’ve met few guys like Ty who are just wired to do good things for the fans and the community,” said Dan O’Connor, the Giants director of media relations and the team’s play-by-play broadcaster.

“He doesn’t need prompting, he doesn’t need to be coached through much of anything. He is a self-starter who often times on his own time will go out of his way to do community work.”

A perfect example of this is when a fan in Burnaby wrote to Ronning earlier this season, Ronning could have done nothing or written a letter back. But instead, he personally delivered a Giants’ jacket to the young fan’s house.

He is a frequent volunteer at the team’s hockey school and always quick to volunteer with the Giants’ Read to Succeed Initiative. And he regularly speaks with students about the importance of perseverance and a strong work ethic.

Giving back was something instilled in Ronning by his parents, Cliff and Ivana.

“I just try to be a good person and if that makes someone smile, I love that,” Ronning said. “It all comes down to hard work and putting smiles on people’s faces.”

And the award nomination means something special.

“It is tremendous. It is right up there with getting drafted into the National Hockey League,” he said.

Ronning was a seventh round draft pick by the New York Rangers in the 2016 NHL entry draft and signed with the team in March.

SEE: Ronning signs with Rangers

He has gone to two rookie camps with the team and spent a dozen games last spring and three more earlier this month with New York’s top AHL affiliate, the Hartford Wolf Pack. Ronning has a pair of goals and five points in that limited sample size playing professionally against men and will spend the summer training as he gets set to embark on his first full professional season.



sports@langleytimes.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Vancouver GiantsWHL

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Portland Winterhawks defender Clay Hanus gave Giants winger Ty Ronning some extra attention when the teams met at the LEC. Troy Landreville Langley Times file photo

Portland Winterhawks defender Clay Hanus gave Giants winger Ty Ronning some extra attention when the teams met at the LEC. Troy Landreville Langley Times file photo

Just Posted

The baby boy born to Gillian and Dave McIntosh of Abbotsford was released from hospital on Wednesday (Nov. 25) while Gillian continues to fight for her life after being diagnosed with COVID-19.
Abbotsford mom with COVID-19 still fighting for life while newborn baby comes home

Son was delivered Nov. 10 while Gillian McIntosh was in an induced coma

Abbotsford resident Leonna Dunning is now $50,000 richer after a big win on a scratch ticket. (Submitted)
Abbotsford woman wins $50,000 on scratch ticket

Leona Dunning purchased winning ticket at 7-11 on McCallum Road

Google Maps image.
Four more school exposures in Abbotsford

Two public and two private schools record exposures from Nov. 16 to 19

Google Maps screenshot taken at 6:07 a.m.
TRAFFIC: Westbound dump-truck crash on Highway 1

Crash occurred around 6:45 a.m., west of 232nd Street in Langley

Krista Macinnis displays the homework assignment that her Grade 6 daughter received on Tuesday. (Submitted photo)
Abbotsford mom angry that students asked to list positive stories about residential schools

Daughter’s Grade 6 class asked to write down 5 positive stories or facts

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry update the COVID-19 situation at the B.C. legislature, Nov. 23, 2020. (B.C. government)
B.C. sets another COVID-19 record with 887 new cases

Another 13 deaths, ties the highest three days ago

Arthur Topham has been sentenced to one month of house arrest and three years of probation after breaching the terms of his probation. Topham was convicted of promoting hate against Jewish people in 2015. (Photo submitted)
Quesnel man convicted for anti-Semitic website sentenced to house arrest for probation breach

Arthur Topham was convicted of breaching probation following his 2017 sentence for promoting hatred

Langley School District's board office. (Langley Advance Times files)
‘Sick Out’ aims to pressure B.C. schools over masks, class sizes

Parents from Langley and Surrey are worried about COVID safety in classrooms

B.C. Premier John Horgan, a Star Trek fan, can’t resist a Vulcan salute as he takes the oath of office for a second term in Victoria, Nov. 26, 2020. (B.C. government)
Horgan names 20-member cabinet with same pandemic team

New faces in education, finance, economic recovery

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A new ‘soft reporting’ room is opening inside the Ann Davis Transition Society offices on Dec. 1, 2020 which is thought to be the first of its kind in B.C. (Ann Davis Transitional Society/ Facebook)
New ‘trauma-informed’ reporting room opening next week in Chilliwack

It’s a space for reporting domestic violence, sexual assault, or gender-based violence to police

The corporate headquarters of Pfizer Canada are seen in Montreal, Monday, Nov. 9, 2020. The chief medical adviser at Health Canada says Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine could be approved in Canada next month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Health Canada expects first COVID-19 vaccine to be approved next month

Canada has a purchase deal to buy at least 20 million doses of Pfizer’s vaccine,

The online poster for Joel Goddard, who left his Willoughby home Nov. 10, 2020, has been updated by his family and friends who received word that he’s been found.
Langley man missing since Nov. 10 found alive and safe in Abbotsford

Family of the Willoughby area man had been searching for days. Police find him at Abbotsford Airport

Most Read