No instructional value in three minutes

I am one of the many parents who stand in opposition to (letter-writer) Mr. Jorgensen on the issue of the two-week spring break that currently runs in mid-March.

I am one of the many parents who stand in opposition to (letter-writer) Mr. Jorgensen on the issue of the two-week spring break that currently runs in mid-March.  He wants it to continue “as it has for many years.” My recollection is that it was instituted five or maybe six years ago. Many parents seem to feel that no real teaching time has been lost. It is certainly true that many of the children, Mr. Jorgensen’s included, are happy to “put in those extra few minutes every day all year to make up the class time.”  Why wouldn’t they be? On paper, the total amount of instructional minutes remain unchanged, but in the real world, adding three minutes a day is not the same as having five full days of education.  Of course his children are happy with those three minutes – they are likely being used to tidy up classrooms and to get the children ready to leave for the day – three minutes a day does not have any real instructional value. Mr. Jorgensen seems to feel that all policy matters should be decided by consultation with parents, and to disagree with the stated opinions of some indicates that the trustees lack respect.  It is my opinion that too many decisions are left open to endless debate, in many instances resulting in no effective changes.  He also seems to feel that dissent indicates that people are questioning his intelligence.  Not agreeing with you doesn’t mean we believe you are unintelligent; it means we believe you are wrong.

Michelle Pahl