LETTER: Buying into carbon-is-the-problem fiction

In response to the Dec. 4 article on climate change by Tom Fletcher ...

In response to the Dec. 4 article on climate change by Tom Fletcher:

Thank you, sir, for presenting some actual science into this global warming science fiction that the likes of Al Gore and David Suzuki have been pitching for over a decade.

People should simply follow the money. Billionaire Al Gore and his rich buddies established a carbon credit company in 2004 (Generation Investment Management of GIM) so they could cash in on this idea of carbon swaps. To do this, they needed to sell the idea that CO2 was a poison and an Earth-killer, so in 2006 they released the book and movie “An Inconvenient Truth.”

Gore made money in appearance fees, book sales, movie revenue and, oh, trading carbon credits while he toured the world with his global warming horror show.

One problem: Carbon dioxide is not a poison or pollution. It’s a plant food. Less then four per cent of our air is C02. At two per cent, the world’s plants start to die. The Earth’s CO2 level has historically been much higher. In fact, higher levels would increase global plant growth and maybe improve our crop yields.

Water vapour is a real greenhouse gas and it is never mentioned by this new generation of Chicken Littles. I guess they haven’t figured out a way to make money on water vapour swaps yet.

The carbon trade business keeps crashing (a ton of carbon that once sold for $9 is under 10 cents) and now thousands of dissenting world scientists are signing petitions and writing their books. (I strongly suggest people read Dr. Ian Plimer’s “Heaven and Earth: Global Warming The Missing Science” for a lucid second opinion.)

Governments have bought in to this carbon-is-the-problem fiction because they see new tax money. Why else would B.C. send a planeload of politicians and their bean counters to Paris recently? Wrapped in a cloak of environmental righteousness, they plan ways to tax one and all for daring to consume or produce carbon.

Memo to Christy Clark and Gregor Robertson: the human body is 18.5 per cent carbon. You can expect my bill for your excessive carbon use any day now.

Dave Kyle

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