EDITORIAL: When will it stop?

Last Wednesday was Pink Shirt Day, or Anti-Bullying Day, as many people call it. It began six years ago at a high school in Nova Scotia.

Last Wednesday was Pink Shirt Day, or Anti-Bullying Day, as many people call it. It began six years ago at a high school in Nova Scotia.

Most schools in this community and others across the nation held rallies, or drew posters, or hosted speakers.

The Abbotsford Youth Comission did all three during its event.

Even in the earliest elementary school grades, young students were learning about, and talking about, the issue of bullying.

In countless offices and workplaces, people were wearing pink shirts, or at least something pink.

Governments of all levels issued supportive messages.

Social media was blanketed with the topic.

There is no doubt that bullying is a high-profile issue, and such behaviour is roundly and soundly condemned by the vast majority of people.

Yet, last week, we told readers about Cameron and his mom Shannon, who had the immense courage to tell their tale.

Cameron has been the victim of bullying for some time. A month ago, his tormentors pushed the Grade 9 student into oncoming traffic, and he was nearly struck by a car.

The bullies were suspended from school for a week.

He and his mother would like to find that driver to thank him, and possibly, criminal charges can be laid.

Hopefully, for Cameron, this is the end of it.

Yet his situation does pose this critical question: If bullying is such an important issue in this society, and public awareness is so high, and so many people are so opposed to bullying behaviour, why are there still victims?

As Cameron’s mom asks: “Where does it end and when will it stop?