EDITORIAL: Caught in the middle

The public schools employer wants the B.C. Labour Relations Board to order teachers to write fall report cards, despite their job action.

The public schools employer wants the B.C. Labour Relations Board to order teachers to write fall report cards, despite their job action, and fine them as much as 15 per cent if they refuse.

The B.C. Public School Employers’ Association considers reports cards essential, as does the education minister.

The education ministry previously advised schools that report cards must be issued as usual, even if they contain little information, because three written reports are required by law.

If teachers refuse to prepare them, school administrators will have to do so, although that could prove difficult if  teachers are also refusing to communicate with them or attend staff meetings as part of their “teach only” action.

So they could contain nothing more than attendance records.

The teachers’ contract expired in June. Their  union, the BCTF, has suggested there won’t be progress in contract talks until the government lifts its net-zero mandate, allowing a pay increase that would bring B.C. salaries into line with those in Alberta and Ontario.

Once again, students and parents are caught in the middle, with report cards being used as a bargaining chip.

The employer claims that first reports in November provide early indications of how a student is doing and identifies those in need of extra help. And parents, as well as students, want to know what is going on, confirmation at least.

But report cards are just pieces of paper.

The information recorded on them is no doubt important, even vital to those hoping to pursue post-secondary education.

And teachers are still recording that information, and will readily provide it to parents and students electronically, even over the phone.

All you have to do is ask.

– Black Press

Just Posted

The Offspring and Sum 41 announce show in Abbotsford

Bands play Abbotsford Centre on Nov. 30 as part of Canadian leg of current tour

UFV men’s basketball hosting NCAA’s Roadrunners

Cascades challenging Cal State Bakersfield in exhibition game on Monday

New hospice programs aim eyed for at-home patients and caregivers

Abbotsford Hospice Society set to launch day program for people living at home with terminal illness

Two hiking families team up to extinguish fire in Manning Park backcountry

Children and their parents worked for three hours to ensure safety of the popular hiking region

Abbotsford Arts Council seeks submissions for 2020 exhibits

Kariton Art Gallery hosts 10 to 12 shows each year

VIDEO: Canadian zoos’ captive breeding programs help preserve endangered species

Programs considered last-ditch effort to prevent local extinctions of turtles, butterflies and more

Oppenheimer Park residents told to leave, clear out tents by Aug. 21

Police say park has seen influx of residents, violence in recent months

Elections Canada to assess ‘partisan’ climate change rhetoric case by case

People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier has said climate change is not an emergency nor caused by human

Unseasonable snow forces campers out of northeastern B.C. provincial park

Storm brought as much as 35 centimetres of snow to the Fort Nelson, Muncho Lake Park-Stone Mountain Park

B.C. log export rules killing us, northwest harvester says

NorthPac Forestry says Skeena Sawmills has plenty of timber

Vancouver man arrested after pregnant woman’s SUV stolen, then crashed

Police are recommending charges against a 22-year-old Vancouver man

Environment groups warned saying climate change is real could be seen as partisan

Talk of climate change could be viewed as advocating against Maxime Bernier, the leader of the People’s Party of Canada

Most Read