Many people are postponing their weddings due to COVID-19. (File contributed/ Julia Loglisci)

Many people are postponing their weddings due to COVID-19. (File contributed/ Julia Loglisci)

Weddings cancelled, postponed and altered due to COVID-19

Many Vancouver Islanders are holding off on ‘I do’s’ until after the pandemic has passed

Spring and summer are the most popular times for Vancouver Island weddings, but many people are now forced to cancel or postpone their dream day due to COVID-19.

“I’ve got 15 weddings scheduled this summer and already had three cancel or postpone,” said Julia Loglisci, a professional photographer based out of Victoria. “It sucks because even though I do photograph a lot of other things, weddings are my main source of income, as it is for many other vendors.”

On March 16, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry banned any gatherings larger than 50 people, and implored everyone to practise social distancing. This forced venues to shut down and seen cancellations of most religious gatherings as well, including large wedding ceremonies.

ALSO READ: Pregnant in a pandemic – expectant mothers change birth plans due to COVID-19

“It’s hard times right now for sure, but even though I’m a small business owner, I feel worse for my brides and grooms going through this,” Loglisci said. “It’s supposed to be the best day of your life.”

One of Loglisci’s clients, Dione Travis and her fiancé, had planned to have a wedding in Greater Victoria on April 18, but chose to cancel the event as soon as they heard about border cancellations.

“We had family coming up from Australia so we knew if they couldn’t come we weren’t going to do it,” Travis said. “In my opinion, weddings should be about hugging, kissing and shaking hands, so we’ll wait until we can do that.”

Luckily for Travis, all of her vendors were understanding of the situation and had no issues postponing the celebrations. She added that in the meantime, she and her fiancé may look into an elopement and have the ceremony later.

Besides doing photography, Loglisci also owns a pop-up wedding business designed for elopements, and said so far she has seen an uptick in requests.

ALSO READ: Friends, family surprise Current Swell singer and new wife with socially distant wedding

“I got two emails just yesterday; I do really think that people will be considering doing a pop up wedding right now, and eloping,” she said. “That being said, I am respecting the ‘stay at home’ safety policy right now, and even though I am promoting my pop up wedding, elopement style ceremonies right now, I won’t be doing them until it’s safe to do so.”

Saanich woman Alexa Way had planned a destination wedding to Maui scheduled for March 24, but decided to cancel when advisories were put out stating that anyone returning home from travel would have to quarantine themselves for 14 days.

“We weren’t comfortable asking our guests to do that,” Way said. “It was a hard decision to make, but it was definitely the right call that was later confirmed when they closed the borders.”

The resort and vendors were happy to accommodate a refund, though airlines were another story and only gave her until December to use travel credits.

Luckily Way and her fiancé, Mark, already had their legal ceremony on a small beach in February to avoid any legal problems in the States.

“I’m really grateful we did that, but if we had we known the celebration in Maui would have been cancelled we would have maybe done something more to celebrate that day, we really just went home,” she said. “We’ve been planning our wedding for two years and were so close, so it was definitely a bummer.”

So far the couple is planning on just waiting it out to see what happens. In the meantime they are dealing with the stress of potential exposure to COVID-19, since Mark is a millwright at the Royal Jubilee Hospital and repairs things such as ventilators, hospital beds and other equipment.

“Sometimes I feel sad for myself, but then you realize a lot of other people are going through it, too,” Way said.

ALSO READ: Death looks different in a pandemic– Vancouver Islanders taking new measures for funerals

City hall weddings are also off the table, said City of Victoria’s head of engagement, Bill Eisenhauer. 

“All public use events, including weddings, at city hall are now on hold during the health emergency for the foreseeable future. The next date set for city hall weddings is June 12,” Eisenhauer said, noting that so far there were no confirmed bookings cancelled, with the next confirmed booking taking place Sept. 18. “At this time we are simply taking a waiting list of any inquiries for June 12, but not confirming any bookings.”

However, people are still willing to get creative with their weddings, with Greater Victoria seeing a steady number of wedding licences issued by Service BC in recent months.

According to Service BC, from February 1, 2019 to April 1, 2019, a total of 616 licences were processed. In comparison, from Feb. 1 to April 1, Service BC processed 610 licences.

READ MORE: No laws in B.C. to force businesses to offer refunds, even during a pandemic

London Drugs, the only other locations in Greater Victoria where people can pick up marriage licences, has also not seen a significant change in purchases. London Drugs spokesperson Wendy Hartley said this may be due to the fact that when licences are issued they are good for three months, and that anyone seeking an extension would need to get in contact with Vital Statistics.

nicole.crescenzi@vicnews.com

Like us on Facebook, send a Tweet to @NicoleCrescenzi
and follow us on Instagram

CoronavirusWeddings

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

Many people are postponing their weddings due to COVID-19. (File contributed/ Julia Loglisci)

Many people are postponing their weddings due to COVID-19. (File contributed/ Julia Loglisci)

Just Posted

Ripy Jubbal of Abbotsford has received a 30-month jail sentence for the fraudulent use of credit cards and credit card data. (Facebook photo)
Abbotsford woman sentenced for $80K in fraudulent credit card purchases

Ripy Jubbal and spouse used identities of 19 different victims, court hears

....
Dutch Canadian Liberation Society donates commemorative panels to Abbotsford school

Upper Sumas Elementary School receives artwork highlighting students work with Dutch Heritage Day

A woman in the Harrison Mills area was attacked by a cougar on Tuesday, May 4. (File photo)
UPDATE: 2 cougars killed following attack in Harrison Mills

Attack victim remains in hospital in stable condition

....
Abbotsford graphic designer pitches Flyers rebrand for AHL team

Alex Svarez suggests new affiliate team turns back the clock and brings back Flyers moniker

Mike Haire, a former vice-principal at W. A. Fraser Middle School in Abbotsford, began court proceedings on Monday, May 3 in New Westminster for two child pornography offences.
Trial paused for former Abbotsford vice-principal charged with child porn

Judge reserves decision on admissibility of evidence against Mike Haire

Jose Marchand prepares Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination doses at a mobile clinic for members of First Nations and their partners, in Montreal, Friday, April 30, 2021. The National Advisory Committee on Immunization is coming under fire after contradicting the advice Canadians have been receiving for weeks to take the first vaccine against COVID-19 that they’re offered. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Trudeau says he is glad he got AstraZeneca, vaccines are only way out of pandemic

‘The most important thing is to get vaccinated with the first vaccine offered to you’

B.C.’s provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Dip in COVID-19 cases with 572 newly announced in B.C.

No new deaths have been reported but hospitalized patients are up to 481, with 161 being treated in intensive care

Solar panels on a parking garage at the University of B.C. will be used to separate water into oxygen and hydrogen, the latter captured to supply a vehicle filling station. (UBC video)
UBC parkade project to use solar energy for hydrogen vehicles

Demonstration project gets $5.6M in low-carbon fuel credits

FILE – A student arrives at school as teachers dressed in red participate in a solidarity march to raise awareness about cases of COVID-19 at Ecole Woodward Hill Elementary School, in Surrey, B.C., on Tuesday, February 23, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. ‘should be able to’ offer 1st dose of COVID vaccine to kids 12+ by end of June: Henry

Health Canada authorized the vaccine for younger teens this morning

A woman wears a face mask and shield to curb the spread of COVID-19 while walking in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, January 6, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. CDC updates info, acknowledging small respiratory droplets can spread COVID-19

Large droplets, not aerosols had been fixture of public health messaging for many months

A picture of Shirley Ann Soosay was rendered from a postmortem photographer and circulated on social media. (DDP graphic)
B.C. genealogist key to naming murder victim in decades-old California cold case

In July 1980, Shirley Ann Soosay was raped and stabbed to death

Mary Kitagawa was born on Salt Spring Island and was seven years old when she was interned along with 22,000 B.C. residents in 1942. (B.C. government video)
B.C. funds health services for survivors of Japanese internment

Seniors describe legacy of World War II displacement

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Most Read