United Way of the Lower Mainland has $6.6-million in federal funding to hand out to local charities and is currently accepting funding applications for the Emergency Community Support Fund. (United Way of the Lower Mainland)

United Way of the Lower Mainland has $6.6-million in federal funding to hand out to local charities and is currently accepting funding applications for the Emergency Community Support Fund. (United Way of the Lower Mainland)

United Way allocating $6.6M in federal funding to help with food security, youth mental health

Applications from Fraser Valley and Lower Mainland charities being accepted for the emergency funding

United Way of the Lower Mainland (UWLM) has $6.6-million in federal funding to hand out to charities that are helping vulnerable citizens across the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley.

UWLM is currently accepting funding applications for the Emergency Community Support Fund (ECSF). Charities can apply online at online at uwlm.ca/ecsf.

The fund provides financial support in the areas of food security and youth mental health to charities and other qualified donees adapting their frontline services to support vulnerable Canadians during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The ECSF was announced by the Government of Canada and is administered in collaboration with United Way Centraide Canada, Community Foundations of Canada and the Canadian Red Cross.

“We are seeing that the most vulnerable people who already faced systemic barriers prior to COVID-19 are being hit hardest by the pandemic. This welcome funding from the federal government will go a long way to helping the people who are struggling the most,” said Michael McKnight, president and CEO, UWLM. “The goal of this fund is to bring swift and much needed help directly into our neighbourhoods. This is local love in action.”

United Way of the Lower Mainland is offering two funding streams to address food security and youth mental health respectively. The organization is seeking opportunities to answer to hunger in vulnerable populations, including, but not limited to, children and youth; Indigenous peoples; minority, homeless and low-income communities; persons with disabilities; and seniors. There are also funding opportunities that respond to the mental health needs of vulnerable youth and their families, particularly youth in racialized and marginalized communities experiencing increased levels of vulnerability.

For more information and to submit an application, non-profit agencies can visit uwlm.ca/ecsf.

RELATED: Food hubs address surging demand for food in Chilliwack and surrounding areas


 

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