Abbotsford Police seized items including cocaine, fentanyl and cash during a bust on Feb. 6. Sukhjit Mahil, 19, has been charged in connection with the seizure. (Abbotsford Police Department)

Abbotsford Police seized items including cocaine, fentanyl and cash during a bust on Feb. 6. Sukhjit Mahil, 19, has been charged in connection with the seizure. (Abbotsford Police Department)

Teen charged for second time with possessing fentanyl for trafficking

Sukhjit Malhi, 19, was first arrested and charged last September in Abbotsford

A 19-year-old Abbotsford man who was charged in September with drug and weapon offences has racked up more charges.

Sukhjit Malhi, 19, was again arrested after he allegedly breached his court-ordered conditions – placed on him after his previous arrest – and was found in possession of fentanyl for the purpose of trafficking on Tuesday, Feb. 6.

Sgt. Judy Bird said the arrest came as the Abbotsford Police drug enforcement unit (DEU) has continued to “target and disrupt groups involved in the Lower Mainland gang conflict,” specifically going after those dealing in fentanyl and carfentanil.

The two highly potent opioids have been responsible for a spike in drug-overdose deaths in the last year and a half.

Bird said during the course of the most recent investigation, police seized cocaine, fentanyl, cellphones, $2,500 cash and two vehicles, which will be considered for civil forfeiture (where the proceeds of crime are turned over to the government).

At the time of his arrest, Malhi was on bail on charges of trafficking in fentanyl, cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine, as well as for possessing a loaded prohibited firearm and possessing a weapon.

Malhi and co-accused Navpreet Dhaliwal and Ishaan Mutneja – also both 19 – were arrested and charged last September.

“The Abbotsford Police Department remains focused on drug traffickers in our community,” said Sgt. Vic Gamboa of the DEU.

“We believe that disruption of the Lower Mainland Gang Conflict and their drug trafficking at all levels is a top priority, and is crucial to improving our public’s safety.”

Bird said anyone wanting more information about the signs of gang involvement or wanting help is asked to call 604-864-4777 or email helpyouth@abbypd.ca.