‘Pillow talk’ on Valentine’s Day: Fraser Health offers education about sexually transmitted infections (STIs)

New sexual health web resource recently launched by health authority

  • Feb. 14, 2017 1:00 p.m.

Image from the 'Different Sex Activities' page on the Fraser Health website.

SURREY — Don’t forget the “pillow talk” on Valentine’s Day.

So says Fraser Health, which on Feb. 14 is reminding people about protecting themselves from a sexually transmitted infection (STI).

“Valentine’s Day is an opportunity for couples to proclaim their love, but whether you’re in a relationship, casually dating or single and looking to mingle, contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI) is a sure way to turn down the romance,” the health agency says in a news release.

Fraser Health recently launched a new sexual health web resource for people to learn more about sex, including protection from STIs, how to talk about sex with a partner, birth control options, where to access sexual health services, how to get support if you’ve experienced sexual violence, and more.

“Don’t forget the ‘pillow talk’ this Valentine’s Day! And by ‘pillow talk’ we mean talking about sex with your partner, so that you can make informed decisions about protection, birth control, or any sexual concerns you may have,” stated Fraser Health medical health officer Dr. Michelle Murti.

“Unprotected sex is the easiest way to catch a STI, and it’s important that a person knows what their options are to ensure they’re making their sexual health a priority.”

Here are some of the most common questions that health care providers hear from patients about STIs, according to Fraser Health:

Can I get a STI from kissing? Most STIs are not spread through kissing, although it is not advisable to kiss people with cold sores as you could catch the herpes virus.

Can I get a STI from a toilet seat? It is very unlikely that you will contract a STI from a toilet seat. They are usually spread through skin-to-skin sexual contact or through unprotected vaginal, oral, or anal sex.

I have already had a STI. Can I catch the same one again? If you have been treated for a STI, you can get re-infected with it again if you have unprotected sexual contact with someone who has it. Other STIs, such as herpes and HIV, cannot be cured. There are medications you can take to decrease symptoms and the risk of transmission but you will carry the virus for the rest of your life.

I had unprotected sex but feel fine. Does that mean I don’t have a STI? The symptoms of many STIs don’t appear for days, weeks, or even months. That’s why it’s important to be tested if you have had unprotected sex, even if you don’t have any obvious symptoms.

I can’t get or pass on a STI through oral or anal sex, right? You can catch a number of STIs by having unprotected oral, anal, and vaginal sex. Using a condom reduces your risk of catching a STI.

“If you have had unprotected sex and/or think you could have a STI, Fraser Health’s web resource outlines how and where you can get tested. You can also learn how to protect yourself from STIs, including options for sexual activities that lower the risk of getting STIs, types of protection, and available vaccines. If you have been diagnosed with a STI, the web resource also outlines ways to access treatment and tell your partner.”

 

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