Gangster Jarrod Bacon denied parole after prison conflict

Bacon was a ‘negative leader’ in April prison conflict, according to parole board

A notorious Abbotsford gangster’s plea to be released on parole after being jailed last December following a failed drug test has been turned down.

Bacon, who is still serving time on a nine-year sentence for drug trafficking dating to 2012, had been statutorily released in 2017. But he has been unable to stay out of prison, having been re-jailed in mid 2017, and then again last December.

Last week, the parole board refused Bacon’s request for parole, saying that he is too high of a risk and maintains links to gangsters.

“At this time, the Board is unable to identify any additional supervision measure that could bring your risk of reoffending to an acceptable level,” the board wrote in a decision released to the media Tuesday. “As a result, the Board is of the view that the risk cannot be managed adequately in society and, therefore, revokes your statutory release as it is satisfied that you will … present an undue risk to society.”

The parole board noted that in April, Bacon was “involved in a conflict between two groups of inmates in [redacted] and you were considered a negative leader in the conflict.”

The board said Bacon remains a high-risk inmate and a member of the Red Scorpions gang. It also found that, while in prison, he maintained connections with fellow inmates affiliated with the Hells Angels.

RELATED: Jarrod Bacon has ‘ongoing influence in the gang environment,’ says parole board

RELATED: Gangster Jarrod Bacon mistakenly released from prison 16 months too early

Although Bacon was first eligible for statutory release in 2018, he was let go in February of 2017 due to a filing mistake. But he was back in prison within months after having been found in bars and associating with criminals in July of 2017. In early 2018, Bacon and another man targeted three different inmates in a “series of violent events,” according to the documents.

Bacon was nevertheless released last June on special conditions. In the ensuing months, caseworkers began to suspect Bacon’s sobriety. In October, police officers showed up at his apartment, but he took eight minutes to open the door. When police and parole officers entered, they found it to be “very untidy” and Bacon agitated.

Bacon was adamant that he hadn’t used any intoxicants, but the documents suggest parole officials suspected it. Two days later, Bacon missed a urine test. An hour before the deadline for the test, parole officials were told Bacon was being taken to hospital after being the victim of a hit-and-run. A parole officer doubted the story, thinking Bacon may have faked the accident to avoid the urine test.

Bacon remained out on parole before another drug test in December turned up cocaine. Bacon admitted using the drug twice, and blamed it on being involved in stressful situations and, possibly, a mental health disorder.

Bacon asked the board to release him to a detox centre. But he has been refused by one treatment centre, the documents show.

The decision stated:

“In view of the clear breach of the special condition prohibiting you from using drugs, the high risk that you present to public safety, your considerable influence in the world of organized crime, even in [redacted], your lack of transparency with your case management team, which makes community supervision ineffective, your less than stellar track record in honouring your legal commitments and the potential resumption of your offence cycle (cocaine use), your case management team assesses that no supervision program can adequately safeguard society against the risk that you represent.”


@ty_olsen
tolsen@abbynews.com

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