An entangled baby humpback whale was rescued near Ucluelet on Sept. 9. (Photo courtesy of DFO)

An entangled baby humpback whale was rescued near Ucluelet on Sept. 9. (Photo courtesy of DFO)

Entangled humpback calf rescued off west coast of Vancouver Island

“These animals are massive, they’re powerful and it really is dangerous.”

A baby humpback is swimming freely once again after spending roughly four weeks entangled in prawn fishing gear.

A researcher with the Bamfield Marine Centre spotted the calf swimming with its mother near Folger Island in Barkley Sound on Sept. 9 and immediately reported it to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada.

“The marine mammal rescue crew launched and spent six hours working to successfully disentangle the calf,” DFO spokesperson Lara Sloan told the Westerly News.

Within about five minutes of the report coming in, DFO Marine Mammal Coordinator Paul Cottrell was hopping on a float plane and he arrived at the scene less than two hours later, joining fishery officers to assess the situation, which looked grim.

“It basically had four wraps of rope around the head and the whole tail stock and fluke were a mass of ropes…It was just a rat’s nest. There was probably 20 wraps around the tail stock and then longitudinal with the fluke,” he said. “The calf was trumpet-blowing and showing signs of distress. It was obviously not comfortable and the ropes were already digging into both the fluke and the dorsal side. It was obviously painful for this poor calf.”

He added the rescue team had to be extra cautious because the young animal’s mother was swimming alongside, sometimes touching her calf, causing concern that she might become entangled as well or become aggressive.

“You really never know how the mom’s going to react when you’re having to get in close quarters with a calf and the calf’s in distress. It’s a highly unpredictable situation because sometimes moms can be quite aggressive,” he said. “So, this was one where we had to be extremely careful. The mom was stressed when the calf was stressed, so we had to disengage a number of times because she would do a high energy breach very close to us.”

He said the calf itself was an enormous 25-foot patient for the crew to work with and that tranquilizers are not used on whales due to concerns over dosage and potential drownings.

“These animals are massive, they’re powerful and it really is dangerous,” he said. “The mom is 45 feet long and a tremendous, powerful, animal that could create havoc if you’re not careful. It’s very nerve wracking, but yet you have to be patient, calm and collected.”

He said the six-hour rescue was full of “up and down” moments, but the end result “couldn’t have gone better,” and the calf showed high energy as it swam away after he had cut the last piece of rope off.

“The calf just took off like a shot…It’s really hard to describe the euphoria of all that effort coming together and being successful. There’s nothing like it for sure,” he said adding the calf joined its mom and swam off. “They started swimming together at the surface, which was cool to see.”

He said the crew watched the animal to confirm no entanglements remained.

“Any type of gear on an animal can kill it overtime because it works into the blubber and it can get infected and it’s just awful,” he said adding the calf suffered some superficial injuries, but will survive. “There’s going to be some scarring, but not life threatening at all…It’s great that this calf’s going to have a chance to hopefully grow up to be an adult animal that contributes to the population.”

He said the gear the calf had been wrapped up in was identified as recreational prawn gear that was set in Barkley Sound and the gear’s owner told DFO it had been missing for roughly four weeks.

“Any vertical line in the water is a potential entanglement situation,” Cottrell said adding the gear’s owner is not facing any charges as the gear was active and the entanglement accidental. “Our first pillar obviously is prevention, but if we have vertical lines in the water, we’re going to have the potential for entanglement, that’s just how it works unfortunately…We’re continually looking at that and implementing any management measures that may help.”

Surfrider Pacific Rim hosted an eight-day shoreline cleanup in the Broken Group Islands last month where 70 per cent of the debris collected came from the fishing and aquaculture industries, according to chapter manager Lilly Woodbury.

“While it’s incredible and fortunate that the Marine Mammal Rescue team was able to disentangle the humpback calf on Sept 9, it is not enough to address this issue by dealing with it reactively. We need to work together to address the root of the problem to prevent these tribulations from occurring in the first place,” Woodbury told the Westerly. “One of the ways this can be achieved is by expanding the scope of extended producer responsibility so that the manufacturers of fishing and aquaculture equipment are responsible for the entire life cycle of their products.”

Anyone who spots a marine mammal in distress must immediately report their sighting to DFO at 1-800-465-4336.



andrew.bailey@westerlynews.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

READ MORE: VIDEO: Rescued eagle released in Ucluelet

READ MORE: VIDEO: Rescued fur seal released in Ucluelet

READ MORE: Sea lion shot in Ucluelet euthanized at Vancouver Aquarium

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Donald Alan Sweet was once an all star CFL kicker who played for the Montreal Alouettes and Montreal Concordes over a 13-year career. Photo courtesy of Mission RCMP.
Retired Mission teacher and star CFL kicker charged for assault, sexual crimes against former students

Donald Alan Sweet taught in school district for 10 years, investigators seeking further witnesses

Members of the Abbotsford Community Action Team include (from left) Bev Olfert, Rebecca Tice, Tally Clement, Const. Mary Boonstra, Mandy Aujla, Wanda Phillips and Devinder Dherari-Sidhu. (Submitted photo)
Abbotsford group raises awareness about sexual exploitation of youth

Community Action Team uses posters, stickers and online information

The driver of a pickup truck failed to stop after knocking down a wooden fence on March 3, 2021. (screen grab)
VIDEO: Footage catches pick-up driver smashing fence on Abbotsford/Langley border

Driver came forward after video circulated on social media

Free Reformed Church is seen as people attend service, in Chilliwack, B.C., on Sunday, Feb. 21, 2021. Lawyers for the British Columbia government and the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms are back in B.C. Supreme Court today, squaring off over the legality of COVID-19 rules that prohibit in-person religious services. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. top doctor has power to restrict access to a place during health hazard: lawyer

Under B.C.’s Public Health Act, Jacqueline Hughes says, Henry can restrict or prevent entry to a place

Photo by Dale Klippenstein
Two men taken to hospital after fight on Keeping Road in Abbotsford

One of the men suffers serious injuries in incident on Thursday night

The James C Richardson Pipe Band marches in a Remembrance Day parade on Nov. 11, 2019 in Chilliwack. Wednesday, March 10 is International Bagpipe Day. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress file)
Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of March 7 to 13

International Bagpipe Day, Wash Your Nose Day and Kidney Day are all coming up this week

Victoria man Brett Andersen is asking for people’s help to secure him one of eight free tickets to the moon. (Screenshot/@brettandersen Instagram)
Victoria man wants your help securing a free ticket to the moon

Japanese billionaire offering eight people a trip to the moon

The Conservation Officers Service is warning aquarium users after invasive and potentially destructive mussels were found in moss balls from a pet store. (BC Conservation Officers Service/Facebook)
Aquarium users in B.C. warned after invasive mussels found at pet store

Conservation officers were told the mussels were found in a moss ball from a Terrace pet store.

Hockey hall-of-fame legend Wayne Gretzky, right, watches the casket of his father, Walter Gretzky, as it is carried from the church during a funeral service in Brantford, Ont., Saturday, March 6, 2021. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky remembered as a man with a ‘heart of gold’ at funeral

The famous hockey father died Thursday at age 82 after battling Parkinson’s disease

The family of injured Willoughby resident Ronald Gerald Jesso is hoping someone saw something that will help solve the mystery of how he came to be so badly hurt on the morning of Feb. 22. Jesso is still in hospital. (Jesso family/Special to Langley Advance Times)
An appeal to help solve the mystery of an injured Langley man

Family of Ronald Gerald Jesso asks witnesses to come forward

During a press event on March 6, Const. Alex Berube, media relations officer for the West Shore RCMP, addressed a deadly shooting that occurred in Metchosin the night before. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)
VIDEO: One man shot dead on Vancouver Island in ‘targeted incident’

Highway 14 reopens following multi-hour closure for investigation

B.C. RCMP Lower Mainland District officer, Asst. Commissioner Stephen Thatcher presents RCMP blankets to (from left) Chief James Hobart, Chief Maureen Chapman, Chief Derek Epp and Chief Mark Point. (RCMP)
Historic agreement significantly expands Indigenous role in Lower Mainland policing

Community Safety Agreement builds relationship of ‘trust, communication and prevention,’ says Chief

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Personal protective equipment is seen in the COVID-19 intensive care unit at St. Paul’s hospital in downtown Vancouver. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
$16.9 million invested to improve worker safety, strengthen B.C.’s food supply chain

Money to be used for social distancing, personal protective equipment, cleaning, and air circulation

Most Read