Homes in this Sechelt neighbourhood were evacuated after a sinkhole made them unsafe in February 2019. (Google Maps)

Developer, government deny negligence in Sechelt sinkhole lawsuit

Homes in a Sechelt neighbourhood were evacuated due to a sinkhole in February 2019

No one is accepting responsibility for the 12 homes evacuated as a result of a sinkhole in Sechelt earlier this year, a series of court documents show.

The documents, the last of which were filed on Oct. 31, represent the legal action taken by two people who were forced to leave their home after a sinkhole developed in the Sunshine Coast community in February. The homes in the affected subdivision were valued at around $1 million each.

READ MORE: ‘Dream’ homes ordered evacuated as sinkholes open in Sechelt

Rodney Burwell Goy and Donna Lynn Goy submitted a notice of civil claim in August, alleging the District of Sechelt, the province, developer Concordia Seawatch Ltd. and two co-owners Ronald Davis and Ronald Antalek, and Hollywell Properties and real estate agents Barbie Whitworth and Shay Moudahi, were negligent in developing, building and selling the home to the couple.

The civil suit takes aim at Concordia Seawatch, alleging that during initial construction in fall 2005, the land showed “numerous sinkholes and other incidents of landslip, soil subsidence and similar geotechnical events.”

The Goys allege the municipality was “actively involved” in monitoring and assessing geotechnical conditions. Specifically, they claim the district directed Concordia Seawatch to “repair sinkholes and remedy conditions that rendered the lands potentially unstable.”

The civil claim notes that after a 2013 report warning of the issues with the land, the district had a duty to warn prospective buyers of the full extent of the problems, “which it knew had occurred on the Seawatch Lands since 2oo5.”

The couple bought the property in 2013, and claim the real estate agents “were personally aware” of the severity of the geotechnical problems, as well as the future risks.

The Goys have asked for general and special damages against all defendants, and punitive damages against all parties except the real estate agents in compensation for their financial losses.

In response, the province alleges the Goys “knew or ought to have known” about the geotechnical issues, particularly sinkholes, to which the property was prone. The municipality, meanwhile, claims its decision to approve the development depended on Concordia Seawatch’s geotechnical reports.

For its part, Concordia Seawatch claims the contract the Goys signed had said the buyers are aware of and acknowledge its “geotechnical latent defect.” The developer denies negligence, and argues the district had other geotechnical information on the land that it “had a duty to share.”

Finally, the real estate agents deny negligence and claim the Goys failed to review geotechnical reports and documents that were provided to them or that they could have obtained with “reasonable” due diligence.

None of the claims has been proven in court.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Thousands have used Abbotsford’s pedestrian and cycling bridge over the winter

Mayor says he’s pleased with usage of Salton Road highway crossing during winter

Aspiring entrepreneurs invited to pitch ideas at Dragons’ Den auditions

Abbotsford and Vancouver the only Lower Mainland try-out locations

Great-grandma’s wish granted to take photos from new heights

Ilona Lelkes of Langley will fly on Cessna 172 Cessna from Abbotsford

Abbotsford football talents ink university commitments

Panthers Catlin and Coronado, Mouat’s Duval announce signings

Clothing, jewelry, purses: RCMP ask court about disposal of evidence in Robert Pickton case

Pickton was sentenced to life with no chance of parole for 25 years for the murders of six women

Ryan nets hat trick in return as Senators beat Canucks 5-2

Ottawa winger received assistance for admitted alcohol problem

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs meet with provincial, federal ministers

Neither party speaking on the groundwork laid for tomorrow’s talks

Speaker ‘will not tolerate illegal activity’ on B.C. legislature grounds, says chief of staff

Chief of staff to the B.C. speaker Alan Mullen says situation with demonstrators appears ‘fluid’

MPs to examine privacy implications of facial-recognition technology used by RCMP

The MPs will look at how the technology affects the privacy, security and safety of children

Dates back to 2009: Calgary police lay charges in fraud involving semi-trucks

Three people from Calgary are facing charges that include fraud over $5,000

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs optimistic ahead of talks with feds, province

Discussions with provincial and federal governments expected to start later today

‘The project is proceeding’: Horgan resolute in support of northern B.C. pipeline

B.C. premier speaks as talks scheduled with Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs

Most Read