Jordyn from Fraser Valley Regional Library demonstrates the new sunshine lamps FVRL has added to its Playground lending collection. (Fraser Valley Regional Library/YouTube screenshot)

Jordyn from Fraser Valley Regional Library demonstrates the new sunshine lamps FVRL has added to its Playground lending collection. (Fraser Valley Regional Library/YouTube screenshot)

Borrow some sunshine from your local library this winter

Fraser Valley Regional Library adds light therapy sunshine lamps to Playground lending collection

Fraser Valley Regional Library is looking to brighten patrons’ dreary winter days with the addition of sunshine lamps to its Playground lending collection.

People living in the Pacific Northwest are exposed to less sunlight than those who live in sunny places or at lower latitudes. The light therapy boxes emit a bright light (10,000 lux) and are meant to help replace lost sunlight exposure by reproducing the effects of natural sunlight. Light therapy can be used to combat the winter blues or cheer up on cloudy days.

“Past Playground experiences were STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) focused. However, at its core, FVRL’s Playground is truly about providing our customers with exceptional experiences both in-library and at home. We are living in an unusual reality at the moment, and it is the right time to broaden the Playground’s scope and include sunshine lamps,” Heather Scoular, director of customer experience at FVRL, said in a press release.

“During times of stress or isolation, tools that bring cheer to our lives are especially important. FVRL values the vibrant health of our communities, including the heart and mind.”

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An FVRL press release states that light therapy is generally safe, however people who have sensitive eyes or skin should not use a sunshine lamp without first consulting a doctor. Further, people are urged to consult a medical or therapy professional if they have serious depression symptoms.

The sunshine lamps will circulate through the FVRL system as part of the library’s floating collection. If one isn’t available at their local library, patrons can place a hold and the next available lamp will be delivered to the nearest FVRL location. To check the availability, contact your local library or search the FVRL catalogue online.

Check out these stories to learn more about the Playground at FVRL:

Birdwatching backpacks take flight at Fraser Valley libraries

Local libraries offer interactive digital novel

Fraser Valley Regional Library adds 21 new ukuleles to its playground

See what’s up when you borrow a telescope from the library

Virtual becomes reality at Fraser Valley Regional Library

Fraser Valley Regional Library rolls out free robot rentals

SEE ALSO: Swap food for fines at your local Fraser Valley Regional Library



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