COLUMN: Lessons associated to my new BlackBerry

So as a grey-haired, older-looking business type, I walked into a mobile phone store and asked for a BlackBerry.

  • Nov. 20, 2015 8:00 a.m.

by Todd Martin, Contributor

So as a grey-haired, older-looking business type, I walked into a mobile phone store and asked for a BlackBerry.

At that moment the place looked like a retro E. F. Hutton commercial where the entire room freezes in their place, goes silent and stares at you.

The sales rep clears his throat and with a look of confusion seeks clarity by asking, “Did you say a BlackBerry? Are you sure? Not an iPhone or ’Droid?”

After a brief moment of fanfare and a few dirty looks, I got the phone I wanted. I don’t know how often I get the sales pitch from the evangelistic efforts of iOS and Android fanboys.

Each one seems highly motivated to save me from my ignorance and convert me to their platform.

At the end of the day, I understand they are just trying to help me see the world like they do, but I can’t help think they may just be a little bit insecure with their lemming-like march to the iTunes or Play Store theme songs.

Don’t get me wrong.  I appreciate the technical and app superiority they may have over my tin can and string, but when it comes to getting work done, I have what I want.

Roman philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero, born a few decades prior to Jesus and 2,000 years before Christmas-less Starbucks coffee cups, had some important insights on human behaviour.

The final mistake of his Six Mistakes Mankind Keeps Making Century after Century is relevant to this discussion:

Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do

Whether it is phone brands, ideologies about coffee cup logos or our religious convictions, it is difficult not to want everyone to believe and behave like we do.

Religious adherents across the spectrum have resorted to all forms of destructive means to convert the non-believer.   We may think of ISIS as an extreme example in our day, but interfaith conflict may be even more damming.

Sunni and Shiite Muslims are willing to kill each other; Sikhism has its share of black eyes, and Christians are not immune to murder, torture and condemnation of those who call Christ their saviour but vary in other theological points.

As a Christian, this pains me to see.

I believe that it is God, through the Holy Spirit, who compelled me to see and understand his desire to be in relationship with me, and that through his grace it was and is made possible.

I feel compelled to respond to that love by seeking his presence and living a life consistent with his word.

I do not feel compelled to convert people (I thought that was God’s job anyway), to knock on their doors, to ridicule their practices or boycott their coffee cups.

On the other hand, when someone asks me about my life, I cannot help but tell them about Jesus Christ and the hope that lies within me directly because of that relationship.

I do believe that we are to share the good news of Jesus Christ and disciple those who desire to call Jesus Lord.

And yes if you see a guy with a strange looking phone I will gladly tell you why I use a Blackberry, but I will not feel insecure to the point I have to try and get you to use one too!

PS – go get a Tim Hortons.

Todd Martin is an assistant professor of sociology at Trinity Western University

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Abbotsford playgrounds to re-open Monday

City urges public to bring hand-sanitizer and maintain physical distancing

Police watchdog investigating after man injured during Abbotsford standoff

Man seriously injured during arrest on May 21 at Abbotsford hotel room

New executive director for Fraser Valley Child Development Centre

Karen Dickenson Smith succeeds Karen McLean, who has retired after 22 years

Annual Walk for Alzheimer’s goes online on May 31

Event held every year in Abbotsford now raising funds through virtual event

UPDATE: Man from Mexico reported missing in Abbotsford has been located

Police report that Antonio Fernandez, 29, has been found safe and sound

Only four new COVID-19 cases, 228 active across B.C.

Health officials watching as activities ramp up

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

New platform allows readers to make a one-time or ongoing donation to support local journalism

Feds looking at ways to reunite families amid COVID-19 border restrictions with U.S.

Some families with members of dual-citizenship have become separated due to the pandemic

Condition in kids with possible COVID-19 link being studied in Canada

This month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued an alert to doctors about MIS-C

‘I knew what he wanted’: Kootenay man spends hours in tree as black bear patrols below

Francis Levasseur is no stranger to the outdoors, but a recent run-in with a bear caused quite a scare

COVID cancelled their wedding plans, so they married on a BC mountaintop

Ceremony was live streamed to friends and family around the world

Trudeau acknowledges racial unrest in U.S.; ‘We also have work to do in Canada’

‘Anti-black racism, racism, is real; it’s in the United States, but it’s also in Canada,’ Trudeau says

State of Local Emergency declared for Boundary as communities brace for river flooding

Warm weather and heavy rain could cause sections of Kettle River system to swell beyond 2018 levels

Large cruise ships barred from Canadian waters until end of October: Garneau

Last year 140 cruise ships brought more than two million visitors to Canadian ports

Most Read