Ride-hailing services like Uber could come to B.C. by fall 2019. (Mark Warner/Flickr)

Most Metro Vancouverites like NDP ride-hailing plan to require Class 4 licence: poll

The B.C. government has promised to bring in ride-hailing by 2020

More than half of Metro Vancouverites support the NDP government’s belief that a Class 4 licence is necessary to operate a ride-hailing service, a new poll suggests.

Fifty-seven per cent of respondents to a survey released Monday by Research Co. said they believe the commercial licence is needed, while 30 per cent are okay with drivers only having to get a standard Class 5 licence.

The provincial government announced last week that long-awaited ride-hailing could hit B.C. streets by 2020, as the Insurance Corp. of B.C. is scheduled to provide insurance options for operators by fall 2019.

“Women, residents aged 55 and up and voters who supported the BC NDP in the last election are more likely to think the government’s ride-hailing timeline is reasonable,” said Research Co. president Mario Canseco, because it takes time to see how ride-hailing would affect current transportation options.

“Men, residents aged 18-to-34 and voters who supported the BC Liberals in the last election are more likely to say the timeline is not reasonable.”

Transportation Minister Clare Trevena has said people who want to make money driving should have to get the Class 4 licence, which requires additional training, a medical exam and security checks.

Opposition groups have said the requirement is too close to regulations for taxi drivers.

READ MORE: Opposition targets licence restriction on B.C. ride hailing

Meanwhile, two-thirds of those surveyed said they want a cap on the number of ride-hailing operators in the region in a bid to ease congestion.


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