Fraser Valley Regional Library patrons can pay their fines with non-perishable food items Dec. 9 through Jan. 13. (Submitted photo)

Fraser Valley Regional Library patrons can pay their fines with non-perishable food items Dec. 9 through Jan. 13. (Submitted photo)

Swap food for fines at your local Fraser Valley Regional Library

From Dec. 9 through Jan. 13, library patrons can “pay” their fines while helping local food banks

Fraser Valley Regional Library’s popular annual Food for Fines campaign is giving people the chance to reduce their library fines while helping to feed their communities.

From Dec. 9 through Jan. 13, library patrons can “pay” their fines with food by bringing in commercially packaged, unexpired, non-perishable food items to any FVRL location, and all items collected will be donated to the local area food bank.

“Food for Fines comes at a time when the financial impacts of COVID-19 are being realized throughout our communities. More people than ever turning to their local food banks. This campaign will no doubt be our most impactful one to date,” Heather Scoular, FVRL’s director of customer experience, said in a press release.

“The library has not charged late fines during COVID-19, however this is a great opportunity for customers with lingering fines to eliminate them by helping feed our communities.”

One food item equals $2 in fines and/or fees, and up to $30 of fines and/or fees owed per library account can be cleared during the campaign.

Last year’s Food for Fines campaign saw customers generously donate 20,382 food items, and in turn the library cleared approximately $40,000 worth of fines.

Local pantries are especially in need of rice, flour, powdered baby formula, peanut butter and jams, pasta and sauces, canned fruit and vegetables, canned and dry soups, canned fish or meat, and cereal.

For more information, visit fvrl.bc.ca/food_for_fines.php or your local FVRL location.



editor@northdeltareporter.com

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