Big Mouth Bins placed across the Lower Mainland, including Abbotsford, through Trans-Continental Textile Recycling provide proceeds to AutismBC.

Big Mouth Bins placed across the Lower Mainland, including Abbotsford, through Trans-Continental Textile Recycling provide proceeds to AutismBC.

Recycling businesses in Abbotsford and Aldergrove support AutismBC

One location recycles textiles, while the other focuses on vehicles and metals

AutismBC is encouraging people to take action for the environment by recycling at local supporting partners Trans-Continental Textile Recycling (TCTR) and Your Choice To Donate.

Both businesses practise environmental protection and help promote a green lifestyle by recycling products and preventing the overflow of landfills. Through collected products they also provide proceeds to AutismBC that help fund free programs to the autism community throughout the province

Since 1990, Trans-Continental Textile Recycling (TCTR) – located at 34272 Industrial Way in Abbotsford – has reduced the amount of fabric in landfills and helped generate more than $700,000 for AutismBC.

According to Waste Reduction Week Canada, the average Canadian throws out more than 37 kilograms of clothing and textiles every single year, 95 per cent of which could be recycled.

ALSO SEE: B.C.’s new autism funding model a disappointment, says Autism BC

People can drop their old clothing, shoes and even books off in one of the TCTR colourful Big Mouth Bins placed throughout the Lower Mainland, and proceeds will benefit AutismBC.

Your Choice to Donate vehicle and metal recycling – located at the Langley transfer station at 1070 272 St. in Aldergrove – has been supporting AutismBC for just over a year and has already had 10 car donations, with recycling funds dedicated to AutismBC programs.

People can donate scrap metal, a car, truck, motorcycle, van, or pretty much any kind of vehicle and choose AutismBC as the charity to benefit. Vehicles are towed free and, once the vehicle is disposed of, the proceeds are donated.

Today in B.C., one in 37 children is diagnosed with autism, and there are approximately 60,000 children, youth and adults on the autism spectrum — a growth of over 20 per cent since 2019.

AutismBC has over 40 years of experience supporting autistic community members and their families.

Visit autismbc.ca for more information.

ALSO SEE: Canucks Autism Network aiming to increase Abbotsford presence

Autism Awareness Month