Raising awareness of MS

Kim Moran recently diagnosed with disorder

Kim Moran is determined not to let multiple sclerosis slow her down.

Kim Moran is determined not to let multiple sclerosis slow her down.

When Abbotsford resident Kim Moran received her diagnosis, she had just turned 30, received a promotion at her job at a private college, and was training to run a half-marathon.

She was blindsided by the news she received on Nov. 10 – she had multiple sclerosis (MS), a disorder of the central nervous system that currently does not have a cure.

But despite the news, Moran said she is determined not to let it slow her down. She even decided to raise awareness by posting her story on social media sites Instagram and Facebook.

A social media campaign #stopdropselfieforMS – is based on the premise that MS is an unpredictable disease that sometimes “stops you in your tracks.” When a person is nominated they stop and take a selfie (a photo of yourself), then nominate others to do the same while encouraging people to learn more and donate at mssociety.ca.

Inspired by the campaign, Moran posted her photo and wrote a caption, explaining her own experience and helping to put a face to the disease.

“I never thought in a million year I’d ever write this post, but in light of the publicity MS is getting this week, I want to put a face to a disease and a cause,” she wrote.

“I was recently diagnosed with MS a disease without a cure that causes my body to attack the nerves in the brain & spinal cord and it rocked my world!”

She wrote that for some people, it is just a hashtag, but for her it is so much more. She nominated others to participate in hopes of spreading awareness.

She added that while there is no cure, there is a new drug called Lemtrada, which Moran said her neurologist described it as “the closest thing we’ve ever had to a cure.” While the drug is only needed for 12 months, it costs about $80,000 and is not currently funded by B.C. Fair Pharmacare, she said.

Moran said she would love to see that change, as it is heartbreaking knowing it is inaccessible because of finances, and “I’m sure many other young Canadians feel the same heartbreak.”

Moran’s original posts have started to spread and her message is gaining a greater reach.

“When you post a selfie, also take a second to pray for a cure and maybe even donate!”