The Fraser Valley Conservancy is holding an online sale of native plants until Sept. 25. (Submitted photo)

The Fraser Valley Conservancy is holding an online sale of native plants until Sept. 25. (Submitted photo)

Fraser Valley Conservancy holds online sale of native plants

Orders must be placed by Sept. 25 for pickup in Abbotsford on Oct. 1

The Abbotsford-based Fraser Valley Conservancy (FVC) is offering online sales of fall native plants.

Plants can be ordered at fraser-valley-conservancy.com until midnight on Sept. 25, with pickup on Saturday, Oct. 1 in west Abbotsford.

The FVC hosts a native plant sale twice a year, in the spring and fall, working with a local grower to select the best plants for the Fraser Valley.

The most popular native plants sell out quickly, so those interested in purchasing plants should do so as soon as possible. All proceeds support the FVC’s habitat and wildlife conservation work.

The fall plant selection offered focuses on native trees, shrubs and ferns that do best when planted October through November.

RELATED: Abbotsford workshop looks at top 5 mistakes made when caring for nature

The spring sale in April focuses on smaller flowering perennials and shrubs that add instant colour and food sources to gardens.

FVC executive director Joanne Neilson said planting in the fall gives root systems a chance to establish over the winter before the dry summer months.

“Adding native trees and other plants can provide so many benefits to a backyard,” she said.

“Not only do they provide food and shelter for local wildlife, but they also reduce soil erosion and mitigate climate change by absorbing carbon dioxide. By planting a native tree, you will be creating shade in your garden that will provide cooling relief during the hot summer months, and, since they are adapted to our region, they need less maintenance.”

The FVC website includes photos and advice for each native plant.

“I really encourage the residents of the Fraser Valley to help support our local ecosystems by adding native plants to their garden this fall. We all need to take steps to reduce the impacts of climate change,” Neilson said.

Environmentgardening

Be Among The First To Know

Sign up for a free account today, and receive top headlines in you inbox Monday to Saturday.

Sign Up with google Sign Up with facebook

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Reset your password

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

A link has been emailed to you - check your inbox.



Don't have an account? Click here to sign up
Pop-up banner image