Leanne Bourgoin-Faessler rescued these two ducklings while traveling between Hope and Agassiz. They were returned to the nearest body of water, likely adopted by another mother duck. (Contributed Photo/Leanne Bourgoin-Faessler)

Ducklings back in quack-tion after roadside rescue

Two ducklings returned to water near Seabird Island

Leanne Bourgoin-Faessler spotted two unusual commuters while returning from Kawkawa Lake in Hope.

Bourgoin-Faessler said she was returning home from a fishing trip when she and her husband spotted two lost ducklings with no mother in sight running down the in-ramp between the barrier and the road near the Agassiz exit along the side of the highway.

“When I spotted them, my husband turned around so I could hop out and grab them before they got hit,” Bourgoin-Faessler recalled of the late May rescue. “There were only two of them and no mother or other babies around, so I brought them home.”

“They were super cute!” she added.

WATCH: South Surrey duckling rescue was ‘meant to be’

Fortunately for the birds, Bourgoin-Faessler’s neighbour was a conservation officer, so she went to him for help.

“He told me to take them back to where I found them and put them in the nearest body of water because their mom would hear them and come back for them, so I did,” she said.

Bourgoin-Faessler dropped the baby birds off at the Seabird Island boat launch. She went to check on them the next day, and found they were gone; it’s likely their mother found them or another female duck adopted them.

Bourgoin-Faessler said it’s the season where baby birds and animals are everywhere and asks residents to be aware that they are out and about.

According to the Toronto Wildlife Centre, what to do when you find goslings or ducklings depends on a number of factors. While they are able to walk, swim and eat as soon as they hatch, they still need to be with their parents to help them learn how to navigate the world and keep them safe and warm.

RELATED: Duck, duck, loose – how to help ducks stay safe on our roads

If you see what looks like a family group near the babies who are falling behind and the babies appear to be healthy and otherwise active, help them over their obstacle and see if you can get it back with the family. If the family ignores the babies or they’re struggling to keep up, contact the B.C. Conservation Service at 1-877-855-3222.

If you find ducklings or goslings by themselves wit no parents nearby, again, it’s best to contact B.C. Conservation Service or a local wildlife rehabilitator. While waiting for help, put the babies in a cardboard box and have a heat source nearby. Do not give the babies food or water; while they are waterfowl, putting the babies in water could cause them to get hypothermic as they need their parents to help regulate body temperature, and hypothermia could kill them.

For more information about wildlife-related issues, please contact the B.C. Conservation Service.

AgassizHarrison Hot SpringsHopeNature

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

60 middle school students in one Abbotsford classroom? It’s true, stunned parent is told

Parent says she was in disbelief when her son told her he was in a class with 60 other kids

Three Abbotsford candidates so far come forward for provincial election

Mike de Jong, Simon Gibson and Bruce Banman to toss hats in ring

COVID-19 testing lineup wraps around block in Chilliwack

Testing lineup includes seniors, children and their parents as demand seems to surge

Shots fired into unoccupied vehicle in Abbotsford

Incident occurred Saturday night on Upper Maclure Road

COVID-19: 4 more deaths, 366 new cases in B.C. since Friday

A total of 8,208 people in B.C. have tested positive for COVID-19 since January

Group wants Parliament, courts to hold social media to same standard as publishers

Daniel Bernhard made the comments shortly after Friends of Canadian Broadcasting released a research paper

Former worker at Surrey brewery claims he was bullied on the job

Human rights complaint to be heard against Surrey’s Central City Brewers and Distillers Ltd.

B.C. has highest number of active COVID-19 cases per capita, federal data shows

B.C. currently has 1,803 active cases after weeks of COVID-19 spikes in the province

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

B.C. unveils new cannabis sales programs to help small, Indigenous growers

Government did not say how it will define small producers, but says nurseries will be included in the policy

Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

B.C. transportation minister will not seek re-election

Claire Trevena has held the position since 2017

Most Read