The staff at Afterthoughts Restaurant dressed in purple and sold purple layer cakes in support of epilepsy awareness on Purple Day (March 26). More than 60 local businesses took part.

The staff at Afterthoughts Restaurant dressed in purple and sold purple layer cakes in support of epilepsy awareness on Purple Day (March 26). More than 60 local businesses took part.

Abbotsford businesses participate in Purple Day

Annual event shows support for people living with epilepsy

More than 60 local businesses participated in Purple Day on Saturday, March 26 to show support for people living with epilepsy.

The event was co-ordinated in Abbotsford by Andrea Critchley, development coordinator with the Center for Epilepsy and Seizure Education in B.C.

Each business that participated used the purple theme in different ways, including balloons, flowers and bouquets, display windows of gowns, special decor and uniquely decorated cakes.

Purple Day is held each year on March 26 and is dedicated to raising awareness about epilepsy.

It was founded in 2008 by nine-year-old Cassidy Megan of Nova Scotia. Cassidy told her friends about her epilepsy after a presentation in her class given by the Epilepsy Association of Nova Scotia.

At first, Cassidy was afraid the other children would make fun of her, but then she came up with the idea of Purple Day, where people would wear purple to show support for those living with epilepsy.

Purple Day is named after the internationally recognized colour for epilepsy – lavender.

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, affecting 300,000 people in Canada and 50 million people worldwide (more than multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, muscular dystrophy and Parkinson’s disease combined).

Despite its prevalence, epilepsy is often misunderstood and people with epilepsy can face social stigma and discrimination.

Purple Day reminds everyone that people living with epilepsy need understanding and acceptance, and deserve comprehensive care and access to innovative treatment options to effectively manage their disorder.

For more information, visit esebc.ca.