Kids diagnosed with cancer enjoyed some fun with their families on Saturday at Castle Fun Park, which provided a morning of free activities – including go-karts – for them before the facility opened to the public. (John Morrow/Abbotsford News)

Kids diagnosed with cancer enjoyed some fun with their families on Saturday at Castle Fun Park, which provided a morning of free activities – including go-karts – for them before the facility opened to the public. (John Morrow/Abbotsford News)

Abbotsford business helps kids with cancer

Castle Fun Park hosts Camp Goodtime participants

Castle Fun Park in Abbotsford opened its doors early on Saturday for 20 kids diagnosed with cancer and their families so they could escape the rain and have some fun for free.

This is the second consecutive year that the Canadian Cancer Society’s Camp Goodtimes has partnered with Castle Fun Park.

Kids had an all-access pass to enjoy the go-karts, batting cages, bumper cars and the mini golf course before the park was open to the public.

Cops for Cancer Tour de Valley riders and their families were also in attendance as each year Cops for Cancer raises funds for pediatric cancer research and support programs such as Camp Goodtimes.

“Camp Goodtimes genuinely seeks to enrich the lives of so many deserving children and their wonderful families,” said Madilynne Blakeburn, sales manager from Castle Fun Park. “It was our special privilege to host again this year and we hope our goal of providing a fun, carefree day continues to be a benefit to all of them.”

Jenna Wright, program coordinator for Camp Goodtimes, said the event was a great opportunity for families to re-connect with one another outside the camp or hospital environment.

The event attracted more than 100 participants, including campers, their families and volunteers.

Camp Goodtimes welcomed 390 participants to its summer camp this year.

The Canadian Cancer Society program also plans events year-round to ensure children and youth have multiple opportunities to just be kids, away from their diagnoses.

“Each one of these families has a story to tell,” Wright said. “However, it’s opportunities like these that allow kids to just be kids, to step away from it all and just have fun.”