News

Teen volunteers in television commercial

Albel Deol and Anna Goertzen Loeppki act out some of the food bank volunteer work they have been doing, for the shootng of a Telus television commercial. -  Neil Corbett photo.
Albel Deol and Anna Goertzen Loeppki act out some of the food bank volunteer work they have been doing, for the shootng of a Telus television commercial.
— image credit: Neil Corbett photo.

Community-minded teens will star in a nationwide commercial that was shot at an Abbotsford seniors home on Monday.

The ad is being directed by Randall Peters, who grew up in Abbotsford and still lives here. As a television commercial director for Telus, he was tasked with highlighting the thousands of dollars the company gives to charities.

It will be a series of four ads highlighting different causes. The commercial he is creating in Abbotsford features the service program Free the Children which Telus supports. We Day, a project of Free the Children, is the largest philanthropic gathering of young people in the world, and has hosted speakers like President Bill Clinton, the Dalai Lama, iconic athletes and rock stars. It has been held each year since 2007, takes place Oct. 18 in Vancouver and in six other Canadian cities on different dates.

“The event is really about getting kids to give back to their communities, and get involved,” explained Peters.

To show examples of youth getting involved in their city, he chose to feature the work of kids from Abbotsford Traditional high school’s leadership group. Peters will highlight the work of six kids – two who worked at the Abbotsford Food Bank, two who spent time with the Abbotsford Hospice Society, and a pair who volunteered for Menno Hospital Residential Care.

He pitched it to the Telus marketing department, and said they loved it.

“These are amazing examples of teenagers who are giving back,” said Peters.

He said it will be an authentic ad, using real people rather than actors, as the teens interact with the seniors at Primrose Gardens, the newest housing in Menno Home.

The television spot will run nationally in 30-second spots, and the students were interviewed for a longer piece that will run on the web.

Peters’ crew constructed a mock food bank at Menno Home to shoot students Albel Deol and Anna Goertzen Loeppki stacking food.

Chelsey Perry and Navreer Brar volunteered at Menno Hospital. Ivneet Sohi and Sophia Bhatti worked with the hospice society, speaking with patients. A seventh student, Aisha Kaay, will be involved in a We Day segment of the commercial.

Johi said she spent two hours every Saturday, for the past three years, visiting with patients.

“They loved talking about old Abbotsford times, and the war… it was interesting.”

Perry said the patients visibly perk up when they get a visitor. She likes to talk with them about their families, and answer the questions they ask about this pretty teen who comes visiting.

“You try to make their day,” she said. “They seem so much more cheerful.

“It’s a great experience,” said Perry. “Not everyone gets to be on TV.”

We encourage an open exchange of ideas on this story's topic, but we ask you to follow our guidelines for respecting community standards. Personal attacks, inappropriate language, and off-topic comments may be removed, and comment privileges revoked, per our Terms of Use. Please see our FAQ if you have questions or concerns about using Facebook to comment.

You might like ...

City signs new deal with Abbotsford Centre operator
 
Operation Red Nose: Home safely for hundreds
 
Metro Vancouver steps back from imposing garbage export ban
CBC fired me for sexual behaviour: Ghomeshi
 
Transit investment key to Metro Vancouver future, conference hears (with VIDEO)
 
Banners honour Pitt Meadows vets
Dog with four-pound tumour gets life-changing surgery in Chilliwack
 
Election 2014: Surrey councillor candidates take on questions
 
Charges laid in fatal Surrey stabbing

Community Events, October 2014

Add an Event

Read the latest eEdition

Browse the print edition page by page, including stories and ads.

Oct 31 edition online now. Browse the archives.