The secret to happiness is helping others

Support people with abilities as a Community Support Worker

Where to start?

In a world full of blurred lines and questions about right and wrong, it is nice to know one thing with absolute certainty: helping others is important, worthwhile and vital for a community to flourish. At times, it can be overwhelming to feel like such a small person in a vast world of troubles. Where does one start? While one person cannot take on the whole world, one person’s contribution can and will make a world of difference.

If you are someone who wants to make a difference but does not know where to start, start in your own community. This might change your life, and in turn, the lives of others. It is amazing how big of an effect a local initiative can have, and there are people in your community who need your assistance. Individuals with developmental disabilities are strong, capable people with wants and needs like everybody else – they just require a little extra help achieving those goals.

A Community Support Worker (CSW) sees the ability, not the disability. A CSW also knows that every person, regardless of their age, gender, or exceptionalities, has the right to a full and happy life. If you believe that everyone has talents, something valuable to offer, and you want to create an inclusive and enriching environment for adults with developmental disabilities, consider Stenberg College’s CSW program.

What does a CSW do?

This is not a career that can simply be described through a job title. There is so much depth to the field that a mere phrase cannot capture the essence of what it means to help someone live the life they want to live. Doug Tennant is the Executive Director of Semiahmoo House Society, which is an inclusive non-profit that provides quality services to those with disabilities. He describes the career passionately and logically:

“At the end of the day, it’s not rocket science. If we can assume that everybody has hopes and dreams and wants to be a part of the community, then our job becomes making those dreams a reality. If we go in with this assumption, then it’s easy.”

CSWs help those with disabilities realize their full potential. By taking a person-centred approach, asking people what they want, and developing programs around those desires, CSWs help adults with developmental disabilities advocate for their aspirations. It is an incredibly rewarding career where you support people to become the best and happiest versions of themselves.

Click here to continue reading about CSWs and the differences they make.

 

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