Crossroads Restaurant owner Paul Chheu holds a dinner on March 1 to raise money for SIGN Fracture Care International, which provides free surgical implants to those less fortunate in the world.

Crossroads Restaurant owner Paul Chheu holds a dinner on March 1 to raise money for SIGN Fracture Care International, which provides free surgical implants to those less fortunate in the world.

Abbotsford restaurant owner holds Kiwanis fundraising dinner

Event on March 1 helps provide surgical implants in other countries

Paul Chheu, owner of Crossroads Restaurant in Abbotsford, hosts the second annual Kiwanis SIGN Fracture Care fundraising dinner on Friday, March 1 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Chheu, a Cambodian refugee, escaped the Khmer Rouge with his family in 1977. He, his parents and two sisters fled to Vietnam, and the family was sponsored by a church in Ponoko, Alta. to come to Canada in 1986.

Chheu, his wife and two children moved to B.C. in 2006 and purchased Crossroads (located at 1821 Sumas Way) in 2014.

Chheu’s grandfather taught him at an early age to help his community and pay it forward.

Five non-profit organizations – two Kiwanis Clubs, a Rotary Club, Bikers Against Child Abuse and Abbotsford seniors – currently meet at Crossroads regularly. Chheu has a personal connection to each of them.

Chheu wanted to help further when he learned that the Kiwanis Club supports SIGN Fracture Care International, a non-profit organization that provides free surgical implants, training and supplies to those less fortunate in the world.

The cost to produce the implant is $100. SIGN trains local doctors and has provided enough supplies to treat more than 220,000 injured people.

At the fundraising event on March 1, Chheu offers a three-course meal, with all the proceeds going to help those less fortunate, especially in Cambodia.

Last year, the event raised $9,000, providing 90 life-altering surgeries.

Cost for the dinner is $25. Those planning to attend are to RSVP via email to annpenner11@gmail.com.

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